Pro Plumbers

Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
toilets work off of siphon.more correctly it's the timely transfer of water from the tank to the bowl through the ports that starts the siphon and carrys the solids and water downstream,thus completing a flush.i also live in florida and due to lots of hard water everywhere can tell you that most likely the toilets are full of deposits and need to be replaced or are of poor quality.all of the toilets from home depot are trash i would suggest getting one from the factory or from a plumbing supply house.DO NOT GET A 1.28gpf...1.6gpf is still legal
Plastic pipe is in wide use for domestic water supply and drain-waste-vent (DWV) pipe. Principal types include: Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was produced experimentally in the 19th century but did not become practical to manufacture until 1926, when Waldo Semon of BF Goodrich Co. developed a method to plasticize PVC, making it easier to process. PVC pipe began to be manufactured in the 1940s and was in wide use for Drain-Waste-Vent piping during the reconstruction of Germany and Japan following WWII. In the 1950s, plastics manufacturers in Western Europe and Japan began producing acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) pipe. The method for producing cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) was also developed in the 1950s. Plastic supply pipes have become increasingly common, with a variety of materials and fittings employed.
I have no problem paying for any service I receive but when Allied Reddi-Rooter came into my home and immediately tell me and them tell me it would cost me 350.00 for them to install a new Rheem water heater (his recommendation) that cost 409.00 I have a problem. If the cost is exactly how Home Advisor indicates then he’s charging 350.00an hour.  I did my homework checked with other plumbers and it. Would not take an hour to remove old and install the new water heater. Thank Goodness I did my research won’t be using their services and I will be letting others know what happen to me. Shame on you Allied
We offer several financing options for new equipment, as well as our Priority Club Membership that grants members exclusive discounts, priority service, annual tune-ups, and much more. Plus, we make it our mission to give back to the community that’s continually supported us for decades. Our team members regularly donate their time, money, and efforts to numerous charitable organizations, fundraising endeavors, and worthwhile causes throughout the Northern Virginia and suburban Maryland area.
The projects we've laid out here are particularly simple, but plumbing can be tricky, so if you're ever unsure, don't be afraid to ask for help. These projects are all pretty straightforward, but you never know what will come up, especially with older homes. We've selected some pretty good videos, but do some research and find some other videos if something about your setup looks a little different. The Internet is a wonderful thing.
"We have found our plumber for life! Jim is awesome! We just bought a house with a leak in the foundation, and in spite of the complicated and extensive nature of the repairs needed, Jim quoted us an incredibly reasonable price. Having just closed on a house, though, we were extremely short on funds, and so to help us out, Jim did a temporary fix for much less, and even though he was going above and beyond and doing this extra work for us, he said he'd even deduct the cost of that repair from the total of the final, permanent repair, when we had that done!! I can't say enough good things about him - there's much more, but I don't have room!"
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
×