Pro Plumbers

Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
My Mom is in her eightys. I called a plumber in Aug 2012, replaced the McDonnell/Miller LWCO low water cut off 47/2 $675.. Same plumber was called Jan 8,2013 back. He trouble shoot the problem and replaced the same unit, yet I still have the problem. After the heat come on for about 15 mins/ goes off.the pipes connecting to the MM LOCO the vibrating starts, shakes, and makes a loud noise. The boiler is steam, I know it's old. Do I call the same plumber or call someone differently?
"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.
Despite the Romans' common use of lead pipes, their aqueducts rarely poisoned people. Unlike other parts of the world where lead pipes cause poisoning, the Roman water had so much calcium in it that a layer of plaque prevented the water contacting the lead itself. What often causes confusion is the large amount of evidence of widespread lead poisoning, particularly amongst those who would have had easy access to piped water.[14] This was an unfortunate result of lead being used in cookware and as an additive to processed food and drink, for example as a preservative in wine.[15] Roman lead pipe inscriptions provided information on the owner to prevent water theft.

 CON'T FROM COMMENTS EARLIER.  However,  the  installation took less than 3/4/ hour and was a basic regulator with no other function.  Looking up the price afterwards, invoice did not list type or price, it appears that it would have cost me around $60 for the regulator and another $15 or so for the additional supplies necessary to install it and it was really a rather simple job with easy access.    Given that, it seems that $300 for less that  an hours worth of on site work,  company says it does not include commute time in its prices, is a little high.  While flat rate quotes are nice, they must take into consideration situations where the work load differs depending on the circumstances.  Therefore, unless you are at the upper end of the harder work needed than the average job. it can be argued that my estimated price of $300 for labor was more than a little high.  Maybe I am wrong since I have not used their services for years and  am not knowledgeable of the costs of equipment and professional labor today.  
Needed to replace a water pressure regulator.  Looking at the retail costs of the regulator, they seem to run from abouit $60 to over $300 for one that includes more that the basic control of water pressure in the house.  Had not used a pro plumber for over 20 years so I was not up on the costs associated with needing their help.  I was contacted by at least 3 plumbers but only one, Right Now Plumbers, gave me an instant quote of $394  for the service without me even asking. Although I thought this price seemed a little high for a job that takes less than an hour to complete, I accepted their service.  Must say that the job was done very professionally and would use them again if needed.  However,
The Handy customer service team is online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If you have any concerns either before, during, or after your job, someone will be in contact with you to help make things right. No matter how big or small your job is, we’re confident that you’ll be satisfied by the plumbing professionals on the Handy platform. When you book plumbing services through Handy, you’re in charge of when the work gets done. And should your situation change, you can always cancel or reschedule your appointment with at least to 24 hours’ notice.
When you have a plumbing issue that needs professional attention, look no further than Handy. No matter how skilled you might be at home maintenance, some jobs should only ever be tackled by a professional, and plumbing is one of them. When you book a plumber through the Handy platform, you'll be booking a plumbing professional you will know just where to look to find the source of the problem and who will have all the right tools and expertise to fix it. 

The movement of liquids and gases through pipes is critical to modern life. In homes, water is needed for both drinking and sanitation. In factories, chemicals are moved to aid in product manufacturing. In power plants, steam is moved to drive turbines that generate electricity. Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters install and repair these pipe systems.

When you need honest, reliable plumbing, heating, or cooling services in Northern Virginia, suburban Maryland, or throughout the D.C. area, look no further than My Plumber Heating and Cooling! We’re proud to be the region’s number one choice for home comfort since 1982. Whether you’re dealing with a broken air conditioner, outdated heating system, backed-up drain, or burst pipe, our highly trained team is ready to help. We offer everything from emergency plumbing repairs to new heating and air conditioning system installation to indoor air quality services and more. Most of all, we stand behind everything we do with extensive warranties and our 100% customer satisfaction guarantee. At My Plumber Heating and Cooling, your comfort is our priority! We have three convenient locations in Manassas, Fairfax, and Fredericksburg so that you don't have to wait to get the help you need.


The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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