Pro Plumbers

Need a quick fix? After having a plumber come out to your house, they might tell you the part needed to fix your toilet or sink issue is going to take a week. Don’t be too amenable if you can’t wait. There’s no shame in working with another plumber who can get the part and do the job when you need it. If you’re doing the job yourself, be sure you know these tips for completing a plumbing fix like a pro.
Plumbers install and repair water, drainage, gas, and other piping systems in homes, businesses, and factories. Plumbers install plumbing fixtures such as bathtubs and toilets, and appliances, such as dishwashers and water heaters. Plumbers also maintain septic systems—the large, underground holding tanks that collect waste from houses that are not connected to a sewer system.

After completing an apprenticeship program, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters are considered to be journey workers, qualifying them to perform duties on their own. Plumbers with several years of plumbing experience may earn master status by passing an exam. Some states require a business to employ a master plumber in order to obtain a plumbing contractor’s license.


“Central Penn Plumbing provided outstanding customer service. On a cold winter Saturday morning, we woke up to a very cold house. I gave Central Penn (Scott) a call and within an hour he had a service technician at our house to address the issue. Not only did they resolve the issue on the weekend, but Scott stopped by later in the week to ensure that things were still ok. Outstanding customer service. Thanks Central Penn Plumbing Services!”
Your plumbing service call will begin with a thorough examination of the trouble; then our technician will spend time explaining the problem and outlining your repair options. Our experts will help you evaluate your choices and make the one that’s right for you. We offer you an in-depth review of products and repair techniques so you can make informed decisions on your plumbing needs.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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