Pro Plumbers

Before starting any work, we study the issue and perform comprehensive inspections to properly diagnose the problem. Once we have pinpointed the source of the issue, we will discuss your options with you. We try to stick to repairs if possible, and avoid recommending replacements unless your system or unit is extremely outdated. By focusing on repairs instead of replacement, you save money and enjoy an improved plumbing unit for many more years to come.
The video above from Lowe's shows how to fix leaks in all three types of single-handle faucets. Basically, you're going to remove the handle, pop out the mechanism, and replace it or the surrounding seals. If you can spot which part is causing trouble, you can buy each of the pieces individually. Otherwise, you can buy a faucet repair kit for that type of faucet and replace everything at once. Neither option should be very expensive.
Clogged drains are no fun. We've shown you several ways to clear a clogged drain and how to clear a blocked P-trap under a sink, but bathtub drains can be a little more challenging. A lot more hair and other gunk goes down them than you think. Add to this the fact that most bathtub drains take a 90-degree turn that makes getting a drain snake down them more difficult.
Most plumbers wont mess with the septic tank. We deal mostly with components inside the house. Did you have a vent pipe in the yard (often looks like a candy cane made of PVC) before the repair but not after? If all he did was replace the line it shouldn't cause a smell inside the house. All plumbing fixtures inside the house should have properly functioning traps. Those traps would create and maintain a water seal against the sewer gases. You should have at least one vent through the roof to equalize pressures within the drainage system. This prevents positive pressures within the system (caused by fixtures discharging into the lines, ie toilet flush) from pushing gas out through the traps, and negative pressures (the waste in line will pull air behind it like your finger over the end of a straw) from sucking water out of the traps.

While it’s their job to make sure your pipes work like a well-oiled machine, it’s not their job to rebuild the wall they had to demolish to make that happen. So, while you’re going to get that water problem fixed, you’ll want to discuss in detail what kind of “mess” they might leave behind prior to the start of the project so you can plan accordingly. Remember, there are some jobs you can do yourself. Here’s how to solder copper pipe joints!


Curtis did an excellent job in identifying the problem and providing a couple solutions. We discussed both and came to a mutual agreement, rather than him explicitly saying this is the only option and charge excessive amount. Curtis was very easy to talk to; even though I had lots of questions he was very professional throughout. He was prompt to the appointment, although I forgot about the time, he reached out and waited until I arrive. I would highly recommend their services for your plumbing needs!
Plumbers may not go out of their way to let you know that a toilet or sink can be moved. But if you’ve been working with them on a renovation, and they tell you something can’t be transferred to a new space, ask them to explain to you in detail why not. Speaking of things people don’t want to tell you, here are 10 things your neighbor isn’t being up-front about.
The difference between pipes and tubes is simply in the way it is sized. PVC pipe for plumbing applications and galvanized steel pipe for instance, are measured in IPS (iron pipe size). Copper tube, CPVC, PeX and other tubing is measured nominally, which is basically an average diameter. These sizing schemes allow for universal adaptation of transitional fittings. For instance, 1/2" PeX tubing is the same size as 1/2" copper tubing. 1/2" PVC on the other hand is not the same size as 1/2" tubing, and therefore requires either a threaded male or female adapter to connect them. When used in agricultural irrigation, the singular form "pipe" is often used as a plural.[19]
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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