Pro Plumbers

Most plumbers wont mess with the septic tank. We deal mostly with components inside the house. Did you have a vent pipe in the yard (often looks like a candy cane made of PVC) before the repair but not after? If all he did was replace the line it shouldn't cause a smell inside the house. All plumbing fixtures inside the house should have properly functioning traps. Those traps would create and maintain a water seal against the sewer gases. You should have at least one vent through the roof to equalize pressures within the drainage system. This prevents positive pressures within the system (caused by fixtures discharging into the lines, ie toilet flush) from pushing gas out through the traps, and negative pressures (the waste in line will pull air behind it like your finger over the end of a straw) from sucking water out of the traps.
Your faucets are some of the most commonly used appliances in your home. As a result, it’s no wonder they tend to wear out after a while – particularly the more fragile components like washers and O-rings. Fortunately, leaky faucet repair is easy for the experts at Len The Plumber! All of our staff plumbers are faucet repair pros, and we provide same day service, seven days a week. If you need a leaky faucet repaired or faucet replacement call us or click today!
Hi Ginger, We're sorry you had this experience with a plumber in our network. Have you left the review for the company? We encourage homeowners to share their experiences so others have an honest idea of the company they are hiring. If you would like to speak with a rep regarding your concerns please reach out to [email protected] If you have a review you would like to submit please send it to [email protected] or visit this link: http://www.homeadvisor.com/write-a-review/. -HASupport
I would highly recommend Steve Huffman of Steve's plumbing service to anyone who is looking for an experienced and efficient plumber. Having a home that is fixed with old plumbing. Steve quickly answered my distress call and was very thorough in his work very neat and clean. I was very impressed with his knowledge and willingness to keep me informed of what he was doing. His price was exactly to the quote. I will continue to use Steve for all my plumbing and electrical repairs and needs. Mahalo Steve!

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“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.


For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
When you need honest, reliable plumbing, heating, or cooling services in Northern Virginia, suburban Maryland, or throughout the D.C. area, look no further than My Plumber Heating and Cooling! We’re proud to be the region’s number one choice for home comfort since 1982. Whether you’re dealing with a broken air conditioner, outdated heating system, backed-up drain, or burst pipe, our highly trained team is ready to help. We offer everything from emergency plumbing repairs to new heating and air conditioning system installation to indoor air quality services and more. Most of all, we stand behind everything we do with extensive warranties and our 100% customer satisfaction guarantee. At My Plumber Heating and Cooling, your comfort is our priority! We have three convenient locations in Manassas, Fairfax, and Fredericksburg so that you don't have to wait to get the help you need.
The movement of liquids and gases through pipes is critical to modern life. In homes, water is needed for both drinking and sanitation. In factories, chemicals are moved to aid in product manufacturing. In power plants, steam is moved to drive turbines that generate electricity. Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters install and repair these pipe systems.

Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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