Pro Plumbers

plumbers must be asked directly what they charge hourly and if that is in addition to a service charge. The two are separate and I think they have gotten away with outrageous charges because of the potential of water damaging homeowner structures.   I had a plumber (not Home advisor) come and replace a part in my kitchen sink that was under warranty---the spray nozzle had been leaking...He charged me $85.00 for 15 minutes of work and I will never use Mr King again. 
I had 207 Plumbing come to fix a leak in my ceiling.  It's a terrible, terrible company to do business with.  He came and fixed a broken pipe in the ceiling, and I asked him to check the rest of the pipe to make sure that nothing else was broken, he said everything was OK and charged me $219.00 for 45 minutes and left.  Never cleaned up his mess.  I went to clean up the mess after he left and found there was more damage to the pipe.  I called him to come back, which he did.  He looked at the water coming down from the ceiling, into a light fixture and said he had another job to go to and couldn't come back until next week.  He also wanted to charge me $350.00 to come back.  I told him that was too much and he said he would make an exception and only charge me $219.00.  Now I have major damage done to the ceiling, the light fixture and the floor.  All of this could have been prevented if he had stayed and fixed the problem.  I will NOT hire him again.
Hi there! My name is Berik, welcome to my profile! I have a more than 2 years of experiences as a furniture assembling and dissembling, home appliances installation, sink drain, fixture lights, outlets and switchers, tv mount, video ring doorbell installation and sound system. Please feel free to ask any questions or concerns I will gladly answer you! Cheers!! See you soon....

Using corrosive chemicals to dissolve a clog is like throwing a grenade down a gopher hole. Instead, Wroblewski recommends flushing your drains weekly with a half cup of baking soda and one cup of vinegar. Let it fizz in the drain for ten minutes, then pour in four cups of boiling water. Find out about the plumbing nightmares that will make you cringe.
Todd did an amazing job, and fixed a problem that could of been devastating. Replacing a leaking water heater and also a replacing a failing, leaking main shut of valve. The possibility of major flooding was a real danger It was a 12 unit townhome which made the job even trickier, as water had to be shut off to the entire building while he fixed the valve. Todd, replaced them quickly and expertly, without a hitch. Plumbing repairs are never fun for a homeowner, but these people (especially Todd) do great work. It is definitely a weight lifted off my chest.
Plastic pipe is in wide use for domestic water supply and drain-waste-vent (DWV) pipe. Principal types include: Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was produced experimentally in the 19th century but did not become practical to manufacture until 1926, when Waldo Semon of BF Goodrich Co. developed a method to plasticize PVC, making it easier to process. PVC pipe began to be manufactured in the 1940s and was in wide use for Drain-Waste-Vent piping during the reconstruction of Germany and Japan following WWII. In the 1950s, plastics manufacturers in Western Europe and Japan began producing acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) pipe. The method for producing cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) was also developed in the 1950s. Plastic supply pipes have become increasingly common, with a variety of materials and fittings employed.

When you book a plumber, whether it's to fix a broken boiler or to unclog a drain, you want to know they're skilled enough for the task at hand. Nothing is worse than sending an amateur with a wrench to look at your pipes. Odds are, there will be more damage than when they started. All plumbers on the Handy platform are vetted, verified, and background checked way before they arrive at your home, so you can be sure that they're the right person for the job. 
In addition to Trenchless Technology, Our licensed technicians and OSHA certified excavation crews specialize in traditional tunneling and sub-slab plumbing repair / replacement.  Detailed analysis and fixed cost proposals for repair are provided to customer upon completion of a hydrostatic pressure test and diagnostic slab leak testing, using a combination of cutting-edge pipelining techniques with traditional excavation to fix foundation leaks while minimizing digging and added expense.  Traditional tunnels or trenches for water line repair or sewer repair are hand dug by crews with confined space training.
Pipe is available in rigid "joints", which come in various lengths depending on the material. Tubing, in particular copper, comes in rigid hard tempered "joints" or soft tempered (annealed) rolls. PeX and CPVC tubing also comes in rigid "joints" or flexible rolls. The temper of the copper, that is whether it is a rigid "joint" or flexible roll, does not affect the sizing.[19]
If your bathroom sink is slowly draining instead of holding water, your problem is super easy to fix. You likely just need to make a quick adjustment to the assembly under the sink. Pop-up drains have an arm that reaches down the drain and connects to a little rod. That rod sticks through the drain pipe and is held in place by a metal strip with holes in it. That strip, in turn, is connected to the little lever or handle you pull on to open and close the stopper. The video above from HomeAdditionPlus has an excellent look at how to make adjustments.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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