Pro Plumbers

No matter what your plumbing needs, you can count on Benjamin Franklin Plumbing® to provide you with quality professional plumbing services. No job is too big or too small - from the leaky toilet, to the bursting sewer pipe in the front yard - we fix it all!  Whether you need new plumbing equipment installed or existing equipment repaired, we’re here to help.  We offer a full range of plumbing services, including installation, repair or replacement.

The movement of liquids and gases through pipes is critical to modern life. In homes, water is needed for both drinking and sanitation. In factories, chemicals are moved to aid in product manufacturing. In power plants, steam is moved to drive turbines that generate electricity. Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters install and repair these pipe systems.


Welcome to Atlanta Plumber Repair, offering you with plumbing services in the Atlanta area and surrounding areas as well. If you are looking for residential plumbing services along with reliable commercial plumbing services, the one company in Atlanta that will be able to assist you is the one company that can offer you all this for a great and affordable price, Atlanta Plumber Repair. All of our plumbers that are with us, are either trained and fully licensed or backed with our over 25 years of plumbing experience to get you the right type of plumbing treatment for your home that you are looking for.

Your faucets are some of the most commonly used appliances in your home. As a result, it’s no wonder they tend to wear out after a while – particularly the more fragile components like washers and O-rings. Fortunately, leaky faucet repair is easy for the experts at Len The Plumber! All of our staff plumbers are faucet repair pros, and we provide same day service, seven days a week. If you need a leaky faucet repaired or faucet replacement call us or click today!
Plumbing fixtures are exchangeable devices using water that can be connected to a building's plumbing system. They are considered to be "fixtures", in that they are semi-permanent parts of buildings, not usually owned or maintained separately. Plumbing fixtures are seen by and designed for the end-users. Some examples of fixtures include water closets[32] (also known as toilets), urinals, bidets, showers, bathtubs, utility and kitchen sinks, drinking fountains, ice makers, humidifiers, air washers, fountains, and eye wash stations.
Bacteria have been shown to live in "premises plumbing systems". The latter refers to the "pipes and fixtures within a building that transport water to taps after it is delivered by the utility".[34] Community water systems have been known for centuries to spread waterborne diseases like typhoid and cholera, however "opportunistic premises plumbing pathogens" have been recognized only more recently; Legionella pneumophila discovered in 1976, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly tracked bacteria, which people with depressed immunity can inhale or ingest and may become infected with.[35] These opportunistic pathogens can grow for example in faucets, shower heads, water heaters and along pipe walls. Reasons that favor their growth are "high surface-to-volume ratio, intermittent stagnation, low disinfectant residual, and warming cycles". A high surface-to-volume ratio, i.e. a relatively large surface area allows the bacteria to form a biofilm, which protects them from disinfection.[35]
Hello! My name is Lorinn and I am 26 years old. I have been working in different construction trades for 8+ years now. To name a few I am a skilled in flooring, cabinets/closets, and electrical(fans, fixtures, etc). I’ve gotten as experienced as I am because I genuinely enjoy working with my hands and learning new things. I take pride in my work, and love exceeding peoples expectations.

Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]


For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
×