Pro Plumbers

Wall thickness does not affect pipe or tubing size.[20] 1/2" L copper has the same outer diameter as 1/2" K or M copper. The same applies to pipe schedules. As a result, a slight increase in pressure losses is realized due to a decrease in flowpath as wall thickness is increased. In other words, 1 foot of 1/2" L copper has slightly less volume than 1 foot of 1/2 M copper.[citation needed]
“Don’t assume that every Mr. Fix-it advertising his services in the local Pennysaver or on Craigslist is a licensed plumber,” says one New York plumber. There is no national standard for issuing licenses. Some plumbers are licensed by the state, others by the counties they work in. Check with your local city hall or chamber of commerce. They should be able to direct you to the appropriate source for a list of licensed plumbers in your area.

Need a quick fix? After having a plumber come out to your house, they might tell you the part needed to fix your toilet or sink issue is going to take a week. Don’t be too amenable if you can’t wait. There’s no shame in working with another plumber who can get the part and do the job when you need it. If you’re doing the job yourself, be sure you know these tips for completing a plumbing fix like a pro.
We offer service on all makes and models of heating and cooling equipment. Our skilled HVAC technicians and plumbers hold the highest industry certifications and receive ongoing training. This ensures you receive dependable service with every visit. Castle Rock residents depend on us for all their plumbing, heating, and air conditioner services. As a local, full-service plumbing company and HVAC company, we are ready to help.
Water systems of ancient times relied on gravity for the supply of water, using pipes or channels usually made of clay, lead, bamboo, wood, or stone. Hollowed wooden logs wrapped in steel banding were used for plumbing pipes, particularly water mains. Logs were used for water distribution in England close to 500 years ago. US cities began using hollowed logs in the late 1700s through the 1800s. Today, most plumbing supply pipe is made out of steel, copper, and plastic; most waste (also known as "soil")[21] out of steel, copper, plastic, and cast iron.[21]
Hi Ginger, We're sorry you had this experience with a plumber in our network. Have you left the review for the company? We encourage homeowners to share their experiences so others have an honest idea of the company they are hiring. If you would like to speak with a rep regarding your concerns please reach out to [email protected] If you have a review you would like to submit please send it to [email protected] or visit this link: http://www.homeadvisor.com/write-a-review/. -HASupport
Most typical single family home systems won't require supply piping larger than 3⁄4 inch (19 mm) due to expense as well as steel piping's tendency to become obstructed from internal rusting and mineral deposits forming on the inside of the pipe over time once the internal galvanizing zinc coating has degraded. In potable water distribution service, galvanized steel pipe has a service life of about 30 to 50 years, although it is not uncommon for it to be less in geographic areas with corrosive water contaminants.
When you need honest, reliable plumbing, heating, or cooling services in Northern Virginia, suburban Maryland, or throughout the D.C. area, look no further than My Plumber Heating and Cooling! We’re proud to be the region’s number one choice for home comfort since 1982. Whether you’re dealing with a broken air conditioner, outdated heating system, backed-up drain, or burst pipe, our highly trained team is ready to help. We offer everything from emergency plumbing repairs to new heating and air conditioning system installation to indoor air quality services and more. Most of all, we stand behind everything we do with extensive warranties and our 100% customer satisfaction guarantee. At My Plumber Heating and Cooling, your comfort is our priority! We have three convenient locations in Manassas, Fairfax, and Fredericksburg so that you don't have to wait to get the help you need.
Sometimes a faucet leak can be stopped by replacing the rubber washer at the end of a faucet stem or cartridge.  This is a more common repair on older fixtures when things were built to last and designed to be able to be maintained.  Other times the whole stem or cartridge needs replacement or the bibb seat deeper back into the fixture needs replacement.  That leads to matching up the right components and often times making a trip to the hardware store or plumbing supply house necessary due to the many varieties, makes and models of faucets.  My advice is to make sure your Plumber has faucet repair kit on their truck before having them come out to assess the issue.
I think it is rather rude and a bit dishonest for people to not divulge their total fees upfront, an of course we should know to ask. But the normal person wouldn't know the questions to ask until they are burnt once like this, and then there still could be costs for walking up stairs or charge another service call if they need to go somewhere to use the bathroom and come back. THAT ISN'T A QUESTION I WOULD THINK TO ASK.

I thought that my sump pump had ended its life and needed to be replaced. The contractor I found through Home Adviser came out the following day and arrived reasonably promptly.  The technician tested the pump and it wasn't responding. He then checked the  breaker panel and all seemed well. However he checked to see if power was reaching the outlet, it wasn't so he tripped some breakers and reset them and the power to my pump came on and the pump works so a replacement wasn't necessary. He charged $75.00 which I think was reasonable for a call-out fee and time spent.
Pipe is available in rigid "joints", which come in various lengths depending on the material. Tubing, in particular copper, comes in rigid hard tempered "joints" or soft tempered (annealed) rolls. PeX and CPVC tubing also comes in rigid "joints" or flexible rolls. The temper of the copper, that is whether it is a rigid "joint" or flexible roll, does not affect the sizing.[19]
Despite the Romans' common use of lead pipes, their aqueducts rarely poisoned people. Unlike other parts of the world where lead pipes cause poisoning, the Roman water had so much calcium in it that a layer of plaque prevented the water contacting the lead itself. What often causes confusion is the large amount of evidence of widespread lead poisoning, particularly amongst those who would have had easy access to piped water.[14] This was an unfortunate result of lead being used in cookware and as an additive to processed food and drink, for example as a preservative in wine.[15] Roman lead pipe inscriptions provided information on the owner to prevent water theft.
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