Pro Plumbers

PVC/CPVC – rigid plastic pipes similar to PVC drain pipes but with thicker walls to deal with municipal water pressure, introduced around 1970. PVC stands for polyvinyl chloride, and it has become a common replacement for metal piping. PVC should be used only for cold water, or for venting. CPVC can be used for hot and cold potable water supply. Connections are made with primers and solvent cements as required by code.[22]

I called BL Plumbing when a small leak started coming out of my shower. They responded quickly and Billy arrived in the afternoon. He diagnosed the problem and proposed a solution including cost. I approved and he went straight to work. Within the hour, the problem was resolved. Billy recommended work that was needed to reduce water pressure for the entire house. I approved the work including cost and Billy had that problem fixed quickly and efficiently. A small leak in the pipe below the shower led to a much needed home improvement. As we finished, Billy and I discussed potential future work and issues regarding maintenance concerning the overall projects completed that day. The entire process was a very positive experience.


Our plumbers are licensed, bonded, and insured and meet our rigid trust certification standards. Our services are guaranteed in writing against defects in materials and workmanship. So if you need to repair, maintain, or improve your plumbing or septic system, you can rely on Parker & Sons. Our plumbing service includes a 100% money back guarantee and our customer care policies are unmatched in the industry.
I needed to hire a painter for my place of business which is a hair salon. I hired Jose and he was just fantastic! His communication was very thorough and he was on time and he did a wonderful job. I actually needed him to repaint the room from a prior painter who did a very sloppy job. Jose made my room look bright and beautiful and on top of it he cleaned everything so thoroughly. He wanted to leave my room spotless and I could tell he took a lot of pride in his services. I was very impressed with his work and I have already hired him to do a plumbing job next in my salon. He is the nicest guy you want to work with and he has an excellent work ethic. He is very upfront and honest he will tell you what he can or cannot do and his prices are very fair. Jose is going to be my go to guy for any handyman work I need in my salon going forward. I highly recommend him for whatever your handyman needs maybe. This man is a true professional!
O'Harra's Plumbing provides clients with an experienced plumbing contractor with the proper tools, parts, and knowledge to diagnose your plumbing issues. We will give you expert and honest advice on how to completely satisfy your plumbing needs. We can provide options for some of our plumbing services to best fit your budget. We give our clients an upfront estimate before work is started, so there are no surprises! We are licensed, bonded and insured. We are clean, courteous and respectful of you and your home or business.
Although needing emergency service for anything is never fun, if its plumbing service you ned I’d recommend Ben Franklin. The customer service person that took my call was courteous and professional. The service technician arrived well within the appointment time window. He was also courteous and professional. He understood my issue and explained what service was needed and what it would cost. He fixed the problem, cleaned up any debris that occurred during his work. We did the paperwork, he asked if I had any questions and then gave me his contact information in case I needed to call. You can’t beat that! Thanks!
To unclog a bathtub drain the right way, you'll need to take the drain plate off. That's the little round plate that has the lever on it for opening and closing the pop-up drain stopper. It takes a little effort, but it's not too hard to remove and behind that plate, you have access to a straight drain pipe you can send the drain snake down. Check out the video above from This Old House for instructions.

Todd did an amazing job, and fixed a problem that could of been devastating. Replacing a leaking water heater and also a replacing a failing, leaking main shut of valve. The possibility of major flooding was a real danger It was a 12 unit townhome which made the job even trickier, as water had to be shut off to the entire building while he fixed the valve. Todd, replaced them quickly and expertly, without a hitch. Plumbing repairs are never fun for a homeowner, but these people (especially Todd) do great work. It is definitely a weight lifted off my chest.


"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.
Two-handle faucets are most often found in the bathroom, but you see them in some kitchens. Two-handle faucets use three types of mechanisms. The first two are the same as two of the mechanisms used in a single-handle faucet: cartridge and ceramic disc. The third type is a compression (or reverse-compression) mechanism. Compression faucets are the simplest type, using rubber washers that get compressed against one another to seal the valve. They do tend to wear out faster than other faucet types, but are also least expensive to repair.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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