Pro Plumbers

Think that by calling for plumbing services you will have to clean up after the work is done? Not when you work with us! At Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service, our uniformed plumbers arrive at your door with shoe covers and are conscious of the cleanliness of the work area. In fact, once the job is done, you won’t be able to tell we were even there! That’s how clean we leave your property. There is no mess for you to clean up, so you can get back to your normal routine without hassle.
Get a minimum of three bids. Estimates for an average-sized job should be within a few hundred dollars. Be suspicious of anything that is substantially lower or double the price of the rest, and watch out for hidden fees, like charges for travel expenses. They could be signs of a home improvement scam. A good plumber will not nickel and dime you like this, and many of us will offer free estimates.
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
When you need honest, reliable plumbing, heating, or cooling services in Northern Virginia, suburban Maryland, or throughout the D.C. area, look no further than My Plumber Heating and Cooling! We’re proud to be the region’s number one choice for home comfort since 1982. Whether you’re dealing with a broken air conditioner, outdated heating system, backed-up drain, or burst pipe, our highly trained team is ready to help. We offer everything from emergency plumbing repairs to new heating and air conditioning system installation to indoor air quality services and more. Most of all, we stand behind everything we do with extensive warranties and our 100% customer satisfaction guarantee. At My Plumber Heating and Cooling, your comfort is our priority! We have three convenient locations in Manassas, Fairfax, and Fredericksburg so that you don't have to wait to get the help you need.
Estimating a plumbing job is best left to the professionals. However, our guides linked to throughout this article are the best first step to understanding pricing. Understanding basic plumbing is an excellent second step. Not only does this help you diagnose potential problems before they become costly ones, but it’ll help you understand what a plumber does.
When you need plumbing or HVAC services in Castle Rock, there’s only one choice to make: PRO Plumbing Service. With more than 2500 service calls per year, we are your trusted plumbing, heating, and air conditioning company. If you are looking for a family-owned and operated plumbing and HVAC company, our top-rated HVAC contractors and plumbers ready to assist.
Clogged drains, water heater repair, sewer line replacement, faucet repair, toilet repair, sump pump replacement, sewer ejector pump replacement, tankless water heater installation, faucet replacement, garbage disposal replacement, water softener installation, water line repair, bathroom remodeling, gas line repair, drain cleaning, sewer cleaning, sewer video inspections, septic line repair, drain locating, leak locating, and more!
Plumbing issues can happen at any time of the day and we understand that. No matter what time of the day or night you need help with a problem you can count on us to help fix your issue. We do not charge extra for services calls after hours or at night. Rates are the same day at night only with us! If you have an emergency water damage issue in your home caused by a leaky pipe, faucet, drain or water heater both inside or out we can help.
We actually have our own guide on this, but the above video from Lowe's is a good basic guide too. Do make sure to read the installation instructions that come with the faucet, though. Sometimes, there are important variations. We've only included a video on kitchen sinks here because the process of installing a bathroom sink is largely the same. However, you can always check out this video from RONAinc if you want to see the process.

Toilets – Sometimes toilet drains are overwhelmed with toilet paper or clogged by non-flushable items that find their way into the drain. Roto-Rooter can clear any toilet drain to restore full drainage and powerful flushes. Our skilled plumbers can also fix problems related to running toilets, leaking toilets, broken tanks and bowls, and toilets that don’t flush properly.


Some allege that putting a brick in the toilet tank can save water, but doing that can keep your toilet from flushing correctly. Another plumbing tip, avoid liquid drain cleaners. Liquid drain cleaners are also bad news—they eat away at the pipes. Try a plunger or, better yet, a $30 auger. Don’t have either? Here’s how to unclog a toilet without a plunger.
“I have used Central Penn for many repairs/installs over the last 15 years. They have always responded in a prompt manner and I found their people to be very friendly, efficient and competent in diagnosing and repairing any issues I had, whether related to plumbing or HVAC. Furthermore, which you can’t take for granted these days, the guys are very respectful of your home and are careful in their work and thoroughly clean up after the job is completed.”
Also, you might run into a problem where the shower arm is too short or angled too sharply for the shower head you bought. This can happen more with the wand-type shower heads and the wall gets in the way of the wand. You can solve this problem by making sure you buy a shower head that fits or installing an extension arm onto the main shower arm. You can find those the same place you buy the shower heads.
“Don’t assume that every Mr. Fix-it advertising his services in the local Pennysaver or on Craigslist is a licensed plumber,” says one New York plumber. There is no national standard for issuing licenses. Some plumbers are licensed by the state, others by the counties they work in. Check with your local city hall or chamber of commerce. They should be able to direct you to the appropriate source for a list of licensed plumbers in your area.
Two-handle faucets are most often found in the bathroom, but you see them in some kitchens. Two-handle faucets use three types of mechanisms. The first two are the same as two of the mechanisms used in a single-handle faucet: cartridge and ceramic disc. The third type is a compression (or reverse-compression) mechanism. Compression faucets are the simplest type, using rubber washers that get compressed against one another to seal the valve. They do tend to wear out faster than other faucet types, but are also least expensive to repair.
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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