Pro Plumbers

Let's start with the easiest possible project: Installing a new shower head is as simple as it gets. Typically, all you have to do is unscrew the old shower head from the shower arm (the pipe coming out of the wall), clean off the threads on the shower arm and wrap a bit of Teflon tape around it, then screw on the new shower head. It's really that simple (and if you don't believe me, check out the video above from Dummies.com). Do read the installation instructions on the shower head you buy, though. Some are designed not to require Teflon tape and can actually leak if you use it.
Clogged drains, water heater repair, sewer line replacement, faucet repair, toilet repair, sump pump replacement, sewer ejector pump replacement, tankless water heater installation, faucet replacement, garbage disposal replacement, water softener installation, water line repair, bathroom remodeling, gas line repair, drain cleaning, sewer cleaning, sewer video inspections, septic line repair, drain locating, leak locating, and more!
Even attempting to fix your plumbing problems on your own without proper knowledge can cause massive problems down the line. Book your plumber using the Handy platform and you’ll be matched with professionals who know just what they’re doing. Experienced and practiced in their craft, they’ll provide you with the best job at a price that won’t break the bank. When you use Handy to find plumbing services, you can rest assured that you’ll be connected with a capable plumbing expert who will get your job done without being a pain in the wallet.

The projects we've laid out here are particularly simple, but plumbing can be tricky, so if you're ever unsure, don't be afraid to ask for help. These projects are all pretty straightforward, but you never know what will come up, especially with older homes. We've selected some pretty good videos, but do some research and find some other videos if something about your setup looks a little different. The Internet is a wonderful thing.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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