Pro Plumbers

"Bacon Plumbing sent their plumber Ryan to advice me on how to fix my problem. He was very through unlike other companies I talked to.. He gave me several plans of how to repair the problem and what the cost was, and the how he would do it if it was his home. He insisted on a city inpect permit and city passed it first time If Bacon Plumbling losing him, they will lose an asset. "
We strive in delivering top quality service to all of our customers. We want you happy and satisfied by the time we walk out your door. We will help locate your issue with a free estimate. Explain what the problem is and offer you our service to fix the problem.  You are not obligated to use us. We treat each customer friendly, professional and courtesy.

Accurate Leak and Line is the leader in the trenchless pipe rehabilitation and underground plumbing diagnosis & repair industry in Texas.  Combined with traditional excavation and repair/replacement solutions, we offer non-destructive Nu Flow CIPP trenchless pipe repair as a cost-efficient alternative to complete water or sewer system replacement to residential and commercial clients throughout Texas.  Our team of Texas Master Plumbers are specialized in sub slab leak testing and diagnosis, using a combination of hydrostatic pressure testing, video camera inspection, and leak isolation testing to accurately identify underground plumbing problems such as aged or deteriorated cast-iron, or failing copper or galvanized water pipes.  Click here for an in-depth article in Cleaner Magazine that explains our process and watch the animated video below!

When you need plumbing or HVAC services in Castle Rock, there’s only one choice to make: PRO Plumbing Service. With more than 2500 service calls per year, we are your trusted plumbing, heating, and air conditioning company. If you are looking for a family-owned and operated plumbing and HVAC company, our top-rated HVAC contractors and plumbers ready to assist.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]

Bacteria have been shown to live in "premises plumbing systems". The latter refers to the "pipes and fixtures within a building that transport water to taps after it is delivered by the utility".[34] Community water systems have been known for centuries to spread waterborne diseases like typhoid and cholera, however "opportunistic premises plumbing pathogens" have been recognized only more recently; Legionella pneumophila discovered in 1976, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly tracked bacteria, which people with depressed immunity can inhale or ingest and may become infected with.[35] These opportunistic pathogens can grow for example in faucets, shower heads, water heaters and along pipe walls. Reasons that favor their growth are "high surface-to-volume ratio, intermittent stagnation, low disinfectant residual, and warming cycles". A high surface-to-volume ratio, i.e. a relatively large surface area allows the bacteria to form a biofilm, which protects them from disinfection.[35]
To unclog a bathtub drain the right way, you'll need to take the drain plate off. That's the little round plate that has the lever on it for opening and closing the pop-up drain stopper. It takes a little effort, but it's not too hard to remove and behind that plate, you have access to a straight drain pipe you can send the drain snake down. Check out the video above from This Old House for instructions.
Your faucets are some of the most commonly used appliances in your home. As a result, it’s no wonder they tend to wear out after a while – particularly the more fragile components like washers and O-rings. Fortunately, leaky faucet repair is easy for the experts at Len The Plumber! All of our staff plumbers are faucet repair pros, and we provide same day service, seven days a week. If you need a leaky faucet repaired or faucet replacement call us or click today!
I just had my pipe under the sink unclogged  and new pipes put in $600.00, then they flushed out the pipe from under the sink to the outside pipe $700.00, Total of $1.600.00, I thought that the price was high, I got the plumber from Home Advisors, not sure they had to do all they did but they said I needed the work done.  The same evening hike using the dishwasher I had a leak in one of the pipes they put in, they came back the next day to fix it. Don't know if I will use them again.. They were K&D kitchens.
The difference between pipes and tubes is simply in the way it is sized. PVC pipe for plumbing applications and galvanized steel pipe for instance, are measured in IPS (iron pipe size). Copper tube, CPVC, PeX and other tubing is measured nominally, which is basically an average diameter. These sizing schemes allow for universal adaptation of transitional fittings. For instance, 1/2" PeX tubing is the same size as 1/2" copper tubing. 1/2" PVC on the other hand is not the same size as 1/2" tubing, and therefore requires either a threaded male or female adapter to connect them. When used in agricultural irrigation, the singular form "pipe" is often used as a plural.[19]
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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