Pro Plumbers

Having the right tools can mean the difference between a quick project and a complete mess. Fortunately, you won't need too much to handle the projects here and what you will need is pretty inexpensive (certainly less expensive than hiring a plumber). You can get everything on this list for about $100, and you won't need it all unless you're doing all the projects. Where I live, that's about the cost of hiring a plumber for an hour.
Even the smallest issues with your heating or air conditioning can quickly become an emergency. If your furnace is failing to produce heat, or your air conditioner is blowing hot air, call the air conditioning and heating repair company that you can trust. With emergency service available 24/7 by our trusted technicians, keeping reliable cooling and heating is easy all year long.
When a plumbing emergency happens, a plumber must be contacted immediately to help sort of the problem. A plumber who goes to a house that has a major water leak can turn off the water to help stop the home from being damaged further. This gives the homeowner a chance to begin cleaning up while the plumber gets to work handling the leak and getting the water turned back on. Any time when the home is being flooded, it is best for an emergency plumber to be called immediately.
The projects we've laid out here are particularly simple, but plumbing can be tricky, so if you're ever unsure, don't be afraid to ask for help. These projects are all pretty straightforward, but you never know what will come up, especially with older homes. We've selected some pretty good videos, but do some research and find some other videos if something about your setup looks a little different. The Internet is a wonderful thing.

Drain snake. This is a simple, shorter version of the big gas-powered snake that plumbers use to clear clogs deep in your drains. But if the clog is not so deep, owning one of these can save you a good bit of money. They come in different lengths and you can buy powered versions, but a simple 25' snake with a hand-powered crank will set you back less than $25.
"We have found our plumber for life! Jim is awesome! We just bought a house with a leak in the foundation, and in spite of the complicated and extensive nature of the repairs needed, Jim quoted us an incredibly reasonable price. Having just closed on a house, though, we were extremely short on funds, and so to help us out, Jim did a temporary fix for much less, and even though he was going above and beyond and doing this extra work for us, he said he'd even deduct the cost of that repair from the total of the final, permanent repair, when we had that done!! I can't say enough good things about him - there's much more, but I don't have room!"
Plastic pipe is in wide use for domestic water supply and drain-waste-vent (DWV) pipe. Principal types include: Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was produced experimentally in the 19th century but did not become practical to manufacture until 1926, when Waldo Semon of BF Goodrich Co. developed a method to plasticize PVC, making it easier to process. PVC pipe began to be manufactured in the 1940s and was in wide use for Drain-Waste-Vent piping during the reconstruction of Germany and Japan following WWII. In the 1950s, plastics manufacturers in Western Europe and Japan began producing acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) pipe. The method for producing cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) was also developed in the 1950s. Plastic supply pipes have become increasingly common, with a variety of materials and fittings employed.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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