Pro Plumbers

Because your plumbing system is so important, our Oahu plumber is honored by the fact local residents and businesses have trusted us with all of their plumbing needs for over three decades. We believe that we have been so successful because in every project we undertake we strive to honor the trust Oahu has shown in us by putting our best effort forward to provide the highest quality plumbing services. Our Oahu plumber would be excited to continue this tradition of excellence with during your next plumbing project.
For over thirty years, Steve’s Plumbing Service has proudly provide Oahu residents and businesses with the highest quality plumbing services. Our professional Oahu plumbers have the skills to handle every type of commercial and residential plumbing project. We are adept at plumbing installations, repairs, and replacements. Each of our plumbers is highly trained, extensively experience, extremely professional, and fully licensed. The one constant in all of our work is our guarantee that you will be completely satisfied with all of our amazing plumbing services.
Todd did an amazing job, and fixed a problem that could of been devastating. Replacing a leaking water heater and also a replacing a failing, leaking main shut of valve. The possibility of major flooding was a real danger It was a 12 unit townhome which made the job even trickier, as water had to be shut off to the entire building while he fixed the valve. Todd, replaced them quickly and expertly, without a hitch. Plumbing repairs are never fun for a homeowner, but these people (especially Todd) do great work. It is definitely a weight lifted off my chest.
The Home Depot has a wide selection of high-quality plumbing parts including sump pumps, water heaters, HVAC systems, pipes and much more. The Home Depot even has eco-friendly plumbing options to help you save money and live green. If you need professional advice or installation assistance with any of your plumbing projects, turn to The Home Depot to help you finish your plumbing project. 
Plumbers install and repair water, drainage, gas, and other piping systems in homes, businesses, and factories. Plumbers install plumbing fixtures such as bathtubs and toilets, and appliances, such as dishwashers and water heaters. Plumbers also maintain septic systems—the large, underground holding tanks that collect waste from houses that are not connected to a sewer system.

Much of the plumbing work in populated areas is regulated by government or quasi-government agencies due to the direct impact on the public's health, safety, and welfare. Plumbing installation and repair work on residences and other buildings generally must be done according to plumbing and building codes to protect the inhabitants of the buildings and to ensure safe, quality construction to future buyers. If permits are required for work, plumbing contractors typically secure them from the authorities on behalf of home or building owners.[citation needed]


For over 24 years, PRO Plumbing Services has been a local, trusted family plumber, serving all of Douglas County and the surrounding areas including Castle Rock, Franktown, Elizabeth, Highland's Ranch, Sedalia, South Metro Denver, Front Range, and Parker. All of our employees are background checked and drug tested to ensure only trustworthy technicians are entering your home or business.
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"Bacon Plumbing sent their plumber Ryan to advice me on how to fix my problem. He was very through unlike other companies I talked to.. He gave me several plans of how to repair the problem and what the cost was, and the how he would do it if it was his home. He insisted on a city inpect permit and city passed it first time If Bacon Plumbling losing him, they will lose an asset. "

We've talked before about home electrical projects you can handle on your own and now it's time to tackle plumbing. The projects we're covering here mostly deal with repairing things like running toilets and leaky faucets, and replacing fixtures like faucets and shower heads. These are beginner-level projects that are fairly easy to do and can save you a lot of money if you tackle them yourself.
Some allege that putting a brick in the toilet tank can save water, but doing that can keep your toilet from flushing correctly. Another plumbing tip, avoid liquid drain cleaners. Liquid drain cleaners are also bad news—they eat away at the pipes. Try a plunger or, better yet, a $30 auger. Don’t have either? Here’s how to unclog a toilet without a plunger.

Bacteria have been shown to live in "premises plumbing systems". The latter refers to the "pipes and fixtures within a building that transport water to taps after it is delivered by the utility".[34] Community water systems have been known for centuries to spread waterborne diseases like typhoid and cholera, however "opportunistic premises plumbing pathogens" have been recognized only more recently; Legionella pneumophila discovered in 1976, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly tracked bacteria, which people with depressed immunity can inhale or ingest and may become infected with.[35] These opportunistic pathogens can grow for example in faucets, shower heads, water heaters and along pipe walls. Reasons that favor their growth are "high surface-to-volume ratio, intermittent stagnation, low disinfectant residual, and warming cycles". A high surface-to-volume ratio, i.e. a relatively large surface area allows the bacteria to form a biofilm, which protects them from disinfection.[35]
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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