Pro Plumbers

It’s a family event in late October when many American households carve a pumpkin into a Halloween jack-o-lantern. The kids delight in the whole process, especially when mom and dad let junior scoop the pumpkin pulp out of the pumpkin. But what happens next is the scary part. Often, those slimy pumpkin guts are pushed down the sink drain then the disposal is turned on to chop it into tiny bits before the water washes it away. Except, it doesn’t quite ... Read More >
The easy to install reinforced Wax Toilet Bowl The easy to install reinforced Wax Toilet Bowl Gasket features a polyethylene flange for floor and wall bowls. Packaged in a plastic sleeve in order to maintain its shape. Accommodates 3 in. and 4 in. waste lines (sold separately). Includes a 1/4 in. x 2-1/4 in. E-Z Snap brass bolt ...  More + Product Details Close

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
Plumbing professionals on the Handy platform offer permanent solutions to plumbing problems, saving you time and money. With their experience and expertise, they'll be able to protect you against a range of hazards, such as exposure to foul water and even flooding. Often, these hazards are caused by an unqualified homeowner, thinking they can tinker their way to success. Using a professional plumber, you don't need to run those risks. However, Handy isn't just for the big jobs—you can book a plumber for work of any size. Whether you need a clogged drain dealt with or a full-scale water heater installation, booking plumbing services through Handy ensures that the job is done right the first time.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Most typical single family home systems won't require supply piping larger than 3⁄4 inch (19 mm) due to expense as well as steel piping's tendency to become obstructed from internal rusting and mineral deposits forming on the inside of the pipe over time once the internal galvanizing zinc coating has degraded. In potable water distribution service, galvanized steel pipe has a service life of about 30 to 50 years, although it is not uncommon for it to be less in geographic areas with corrosive water contaminants.
Alejandro is the best, most versatile plumber I have ever used. When I needed a new toilet installed in a guest bedroom, he also did a great job replacing the the damaged tile work around the base of the old toilet. When I had new countertops installed in my kitchen, he came up with a creative solution to a problem I had with the old gas line running to my stove-top. He is not expensive, a nice guy and a true professional.
“Central Penn Plumbing provided outstanding customer service. On a cold winter Saturday morning, we woke up to a very cold house. I gave Central Penn (Scott) a call and within an hour he had a service technician at our house to address the issue. Not only did they resolve the issue on the weekend, but Scott stopped by later in the week to ensure that things were still ok. Outstanding customer service. Thanks Central Penn Plumbing Services!”
Before you get involved with most plumbing projects, you'll need to shut off the water flowing to whatever you're working on. Most of the time, there are easy-to-access gate valves or compression valves that you can turn with your hand. Turn them clockwise all the way to turn off the water and counter-clockwise to turn it back on when you're done. For sinks, look under the sink and you'll usually see two valves—one for hot water and one for cold. On kitchen sinks, you might also see valves for the ice maker on your fridge or your dishwasher. Just turn them all off. For toilets, the valves are on the wall or right on the pipe behind the toilet.
Although needing emergency service for anything is never fun, if its plumbing service you ned I’d recommend Ben Franklin. The customer service person that took my call was courteous and professional. The service technician arrived well within the appointment time window. He was also courteous and professional. He understood my issue and explained what service was needed and what it would cost. He fixed the problem, cleaned up any debris that occurred during his work. We did the paperwork, he asked if I had any questions and then gave me his contact information in case I needed to call. You can’t beat that! Thanks!
Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.

Plumbing professionals on the Handy platform offer permanent solutions to plumbing problems, saving you time and money. With their experience and expertise, they'll be able to protect you against a range of hazards, such as exposure to foul water and even flooding. Often, these hazards are caused by an unqualified homeowner, thinking they can tinker their way to success. Using a professional plumber, you don't need to run those risks. However, Handy isn't just for the big jobs—you can book a plumber for work of any size. Whether you need a clogged drain dealt with or a full-scale water heater installation, booking plumbing services through Handy ensures that the job is done right the first time.

The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.

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