Pro Plumbers

At Len The Plumber, we’ve seen it all when it comes to leaky faucets. Let’s face it – your faucets are some of the most frequently used appliances in your home. All that wear and tear is bound to catch up with them at some point! That’s why we offer fast, full-service faucet repair and replacement in the Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia area seven days a week. Call us today if you need:
It’s impossible to maintain your desired levels of comfort at home or work without the proper plumbing equipment. From hot showers and reliable kitchen appliances to properly flowing sewer lines and leak-free properties, the right plumbing system can keep you from dealing with a heap of plumbing headaches. Leave it to the plumbing professionals to ensure your equipment operates year-round.
We want to be the plumbing company you turn to whether you have an annoying leak, an outdated water heater, drain lines that won't drain, a troublesome boiler, a furnace that won't heat or an air conditioner that won't cool. Whether its an emergency or you are preparing for the coming season, give us a call and we can help you repair or maintain your plumbing, heating and cooling systems for years of great service to you and your family!

“Don’t assume that every Mr. Fix-it advertising his services in the local Pennysaver or on Craigslist is a licensed plumber,” says one New York plumber. There is no national standard for issuing licenses. Some plumbers are licensed by the state, others by the counties they work in. Check with your local city hall or chamber of commerce. They should be able to direct you to the appropriate source for a list of licensed plumbers in your area.
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]

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Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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