Pro Plumbers

If you have a major fix in your home, it’s important to shop around for a plumber to do the work. At least three bids will help you determine the range of the project, so you can weigh the pros and cons of price and the reputation of the plumbers. Get references and contact them. Also, a good plumber isn’t likely to nickel and dime you. For the smaller jobs, check out these 11 plumbing tricks.

Water heaters are tasked with heating the water that passes through the pipes to every shower, tub, and sink. These heaters are also supposed to heat water for the washing machine and dishwasher. These units can hold up for a long time, but may begin to cause problems over time. When the heater does not heat water properly all the time, leaks, or makes odd noises, homeowners will know that there is a problem. A water heater that begins to leak could start flooding the house at any moment. A water heater that makes odd sounds could be under pressure and about to burst. In each of these cases, it could be dangerous for the homeowner, and only a licensed Manhattan plumber can fix the problem or replace the water heater altogether.
When something goes wrong with your plumbing system, speed is essential. The faster you address the problem, the better off you and your wallet will be. Water can quickly cause thousands of dollars in damage. Leaks can soak floors, ceilings and foundations, causing rot and mold that may make your home uninhabitable. Get a direct quote from a professional plumber.  Continue Reading
"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.
No plumber is going to come right out and explain that they don’t have the required license to work for you. So if you know someone who is a great plumber, but they don’t have a license, hire them at your own risk. Licensed plumbers know the local building codes and regulations, have completed a certain amount of hours on the job and are insured. Want to become a master plumber yourself? Here are 28 tips.
“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.
Todd did an amazing job, and fixed a problem that could of been devastating. Replacing a leaking water heater and also a replacing a failing, leaking main shut of valve. The possibility of major flooding was a real danger It was a 12 unit townhome which made the job even trickier, as water had to be shut off to the entire building while he fixed the valve. Todd, replaced them quickly and expertly, without a hitch. Plumbing repairs are never fun for a homeowner, but these people (especially Todd) do great work. It is definitely a weight lifted off my chest.
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
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