Pro Plumbers

Len The Plumber is a full service plumbing and drain cleaning company serving the entire Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area as well as Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Charles, Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, Loudoun, Prince William, Falls Church, Manassas, Delaware, Chester, New Castle, and Stafford counties. We are continuing to grow and expand our service areas so please continue to check-in to see if we are in your area and always feel free to call if you have a question. Our service area map shows all the counties and district that we currently serve.
At Len The Plumber, we’ve seen it all when it comes to leaky faucets. Let’s face it – your faucets are some of the most frequently used appliances in your home. All that wear and tear is bound to catch up with them at some point! That’s why we offer fast, full-service faucet repair and replacement in the Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia area seven days a week. Call us today if you need:
My plumbing experience was  to have the plumbing  disconnected under the sink so the counter top and new sink could be installed.  I thought the service  of $115 was high, but usually if there is an additional fees, it is usually rolled into the cost of repairs or labor.  This company also charged 3.75 % for putting it on a credit card, which was not mentioned until I received the invoice in the mail after paying on the phone.
Todd did an amazing job, and fixed a problem that could of been devastating. Replacing a leaking water heater and also a replacing a failing, leaking main shut of valve. The possibility of major flooding was a real danger It was a 12 unit townhome which made the job even trickier, as water had to be shut off to the entire building while he fixed the valve. Todd, replaced them quickly and expertly, without a hitch. Plumbing repairs are never fun for a homeowner, but these people (especially Todd) do great work. It is definitely a weight lifted off my chest.
“Don’t assume that every Mr. Fix-it advertising his services in the local Pennysaver or on Craigslist is a licensed plumber,” says one New York plumber. There is no national standard for issuing licenses. Some plumbers are licensed by the state, others by the counties they work in. Check with your local city hall or chamber of commerce. They should be able to direct you to the appropriate source for a list of licensed plumbers in your area.
I had called Ben Franklin to fix a pin hole leak in the meter horn. Booking an appointment was very easy and the crew (Sid and Brandon) showed up on time. They quickly found out that a stop valve was not working and had to be replaced as well. Sid clearly explained my options and the charges upfront. He dealt with the city for water shut off, went about the job in a quick and efficient manner. Sid was very professional and explained clearly what he was doing. He patiently answered all my questions. Brandon was very practical and frank. As they were finishing up (I had to leave the house for an hour) they spotted a leak in another valve and fixed that also. I thought it was highly ethical of them to do so. Thank you Sid and Brandon!

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Bacteria have been shown to live in "premises plumbing systems". The latter refers to the "pipes and fixtures within a building that transport water to taps after it is delivered by the utility".[34] Community water systems have been known for centuries to spread waterborne diseases like typhoid and cholera, however "opportunistic premises plumbing pathogens" have been recognized only more recently; Legionella pneumophila discovered in 1976, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly tracked bacteria, which people with depressed immunity can inhale or ingest and may become infected with.[35] These opportunistic pathogens can grow for example in faucets, shower heads, water heaters and along pipe walls. Reasons that favor their growth are "high surface-to-volume ratio, intermittent stagnation, low disinfectant residual, and warming cycles". A high surface-to-volume ratio, i.e. a relatively large surface area allows the bacteria to form a biofilm, which protects them from disinfection.[35]
“Don’t assume that every Mr. Fix-it advertising his services in the local Pennysaver or on Craigslist is a licensed plumber,” says one New York plumber. There is no national standard for issuing licenses. Some plumbers are licensed by the state, others by the counties they work in. Check with your local city hall or chamber of commerce. They should be able to direct you to the appropriate source for a list of licensed plumbers in your area.

Cast iron and ductile iron pipe was long a lower-cost alternative to copper, before the advent of durable plastic materials but special non-conductive fittings must be used where transitions are to be made to other metallic pipes, except for terminal fittings, in order to avoid corrosion owing to electrochemical reactions between dissimilar metals (see galvanic cell).[17]
Another way to avoid a service call from your plumber is to make sure the outside faucets are turned off in the winter and make sure you disconnect the outside hoses. You need to shut the water off from the inside. Then, open the valve on the outside to let the water that’s in there drain out—you switch both of them to the opposite direction so one is always closed and one is always open. We have to fix tons of these in the spring mostly because people leave their outside hoses connected and they freeze up. The repair could cost $100-$200 or more. Another tip would be if you’re going away for any length of time, like on vacation, turn off your water. If on any of those days the temperature drops below freezing, have someone check in on your house. I’ve been called to homes where the family returned from vacation, and there was water flooding out from the front door.
I had 207 Plumbing come to fix a leak in my ceiling.  It's a terrible, terrible company to do business with.  He came and fixed a broken pipe in the ceiling, and I asked him to check the rest of the pipe to make sure that nothing else was broken, he said everything was OK and charged me $219.00 for 45 minutes and left.  Never cleaned up his mess.  I went to clean up the mess after he left and found there was more damage to the pipe.  I called him to come back, which he did.  He looked at the water coming down from the ceiling, into a light fixture and said he had another job to go to and couldn't come back until next week.  He also wanted to charge me $350.00 to come back.  I told him that was too much and he said he would make an exception and only charge me $219.00.  Now I have major damage done to the ceiling, the light fixture and the floor.  All of this could have been prevented if he had stayed and fixed the problem.  I will NOT hire him again.
We offer service on all makes and models of heating and cooling equipment. Our skilled HVAC technicians and plumbers hold the highest industry certifications and receive ongoing training. This ensures you receive dependable service with every visit. Castle Rock residents depend on us for all their plumbing, heating, and air conditioner services. As a local, full-service plumbing company and HVAC company, we are ready to help.
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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