Pro Plumbers

We've talked before about home electrical projects you can handle on your own and now it's time to tackle plumbing. The projects we're covering here mostly deal with repairing things like running toilets and leaky faucets, and replacing fixtures like faucets and shower heads. These are beginner-level projects that are fairly easy to do and can save you a lot of money if you tackle them yourself.
How do you know a company cares about the quality of their work? They stand behind it - that's how. At Benjamin Franklin Plumbing, the warranties and guarantees are industry leading because of our experienced technicians and the high quality parts we use. Our technicians are friendly, clean, polite, drug-free and experienced--and our techniques are state-of-the-art, guaranteed!
When you have a plumbing issue that needs professional attention, look no further than Handy. No matter how skilled you might be at home maintenance, some jobs should only ever be tackled by a professional, and plumbing is one of them. When you book a plumber through the Handy platform, you'll be booking a plumbing professional you will know just where to look to find the source of the problem and who will have all the right tools and expertise to fix it. 
To unclog a bathtub drain the right way, you'll need to take the drain plate off. That's the little round plate that has the lever on it for opening and closing the pop-up drain stopper. It takes a little effort, but it's not too hard to remove and behind that plate, you have access to a straight drain pipe you can send the drain snake down. Check out the video above from This Old House for instructions.
Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.

Steve Huffman of Steve's Plumbing Service has made more than one service call to my house. Each time I have been more than pleased with his job. He responds relatively soon to a call. He is a fast and neat worker, at the same time a very efficient and neat worker. He never leaves a mess but cleans up thoroughly when the job is finished. His prices are very reasonable. I do not hesitate to recommend him to my family and close friends.
Instead, you will be guided every step of the way. A friendly representative will greet you at your first phone call and work with you to schedule a convenient appointment time. Our plumbers take the time to listen to your concerns, address all of your questions, and make sure you receive the type of service you expect. This leaves no room for surprises.
If you have questions about what parts to buy for your fixtures, the folks at the hardware store will most likely have an answer for you. Come equipped with the brand and model of your fixture and, even better, some pictures. They'll point you in the right direction. And if at any point you feel like you're in over your head, call a plumber. Even if you think you have the skills to do the job, there might be codes involved and you often need a permit.

Plumbing reached its early apex in ancient Rome, which saw the introduction of expansive systems of aqueducts, tile wastewater removal, and widespread use of lead pipes. With the Fall of Rome both water supply and sanitation stagnated—or regressed—for well over 1,000 years. Improvement was very slow, with little effective progress made until the growth of modern densely populated cities in the 1800s. During this period, public health authorities began pressing for better waste disposal systems to be installed, to prevent or control epidemics of disease. Earlier, the waste disposal system had merely consisted of collecting waste and dumping it on the ground or into a river. Eventually the development of separate, underground water and sewage systems eliminated open sewage ditches and cesspools.
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