Pro Plumbers

“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.
Steve Huffman of Steve's Plumbing Service has made more than one service call to my house. Each time I have been more than pleased with his job. He responds relatively soon to a call. He is a fast and neat worker, at the same time a very efficient and neat worker. He never leaves a mess but cleans up thoroughly when the job is finished. His prices are very reasonable. I do not hesitate to recommend him to my family and close friends.
My plumbing experience was  to have the plumbing  disconnected under the sink so the counter top and new sink could be installed.  I thought the service  of $115 was high, but usually if there is an additional fees, it is usually rolled into the cost of repairs or labor.  This company also charged 3.75 % for putting it on a credit card, which was not mentioned until I received the invoice in the mail after paying on the phone.
To unclog a bathtub drain the right way, you'll need to take the drain plate off. That's the little round plate that has the lever on it for opening and closing the pop-up drain stopper. It takes a little effort, but it's not too hard to remove and behind that plate, you have access to a straight drain pipe you can send the drain snake down. Check out the video above from This Old House for instructions.

Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]

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