Pro Plumbers

When a person has a blockage in their sewage system they often try to fix it themselves by adding an acid or a base such as Drano in an attempt to dissolve or dislodge the problem. These chemicals can get into the plumbers eyes [14]when the sewage is splashed during the repair. The plumbers skin during the repair does come into contact with the sewage water.[15] The owner of the toilet might not report to the plumber they have already tried Drano a highly caustic base .
For details about apprenticeship or other opportunities in this occupation, contact the offices of the state employment service; the state apprenticeship agency; local plumbing, heating, and cooling contractors or firms that employ fitters; or local union–management apprenticeship committees. Apprenticeship information is available from the U.S. Department of Labor's Apprenticeship program online, or by phone at 877-872-5627.
Plumbers may not go out of their way to let you know that a toilet or sink can be moved. But if you’ve been working with them on a renovation, and they tell you something can’t be transferred to a new space, ask them to explain to you in detail why not. Speaking of things people don’t want to tell you, here are 10 things your neighbor isn’t being up-front about.
B&L Plumbing Service, Inc. offers a variety of residential and commercial plumbing services in the Kansas City metro area. We are a family owned and operated business and have been satisfying our customers since 1998. At B&L Plumbing, we go above and beyond to take care of our customers and are always ready to take care of any problem that you may have with your plumbing systems. We know your time is valuable. That is why when you call, we will arrive when you need us with a skilled service technician and a well stocked truck ready to troubleshoot, and repair your plumbing problem on the spot.
Some allege that putting a brick in the toilet tank can save water, but doing that can keep your toilet from flushing correctly. Another plumbing tip, avoid liquid drain cleaners. Liquid drain cleaners are also bad news—they eat away at the pipes. Try a plunger or, better yet, a $30 auger. Don’t have either? Here’s how to unclog a toilet without a plunger.

For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
Don’t try to repair, replace, or install faulty or broken plumbing equipment on your own. Hire the top plumbers in town to take care of your needs! We’re capable of detecting the source of the issues fast. Trust us to advise you on the most effective solutions custom-tailored to eliminating them. Our Cincinnati plumbing company always comes prepared with the best tools and equipment. We also provide upfront pricing and money-saving deals and specials to keep more money in your pockets.
Before you get involved with most plumbing projects, you'll need to shut off the water flowing to whatever you're working on. Most of the time, there are easy-to-access gate valves or compression valves that you can turn with your hand. Turn them clockwise all the way to turn off the water and counter-clockwise to turn it back on when you're done. For sinks, look under the sink and you'll usually see two valves—one for hot water and one for cold. On kitchen sinks, you might also see valves for the ice maker on your fridge or your dishwasher. Just turn them all off. For toilets, the valves are on the wall or right on the pipe behind the toilet.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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