Pro Plumbers

Garbage disposers usually come with an Allen key. Find a good place to store it, and when the disposer jams, you can follow the directions in the owner’s manual to fix it yourself. It’s as simple as inserting and twisting, and doing this yourself will save you the hassle and cash of a service call to the plumber. Speaking of tool storage, check out these clever tool storage ideas.

Plumbers may not go out of their way to let you know that a toilet or sink can be moved. But if you’ve been working with them on a renovation, and they tell you something can’t be transferred to a new space, ask them to explain to you in detail why not. Speaking of things people don’t want to tell you, here are 10 things your neighbor isn’t being up-front about.


If you need your leaky faucet repaired, don’t wait! Fill out the “Schedule Appointment” form or pick up the phone and call us today – we’ll have your leaky faucets fixed up in no time.  Our plumbing technicians service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The counties we service include the following: Baltimore County, Delaware County, New Castle County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Cecil County, Fairfax, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church and Manassas.
Hi Kenneth, We would be happy to get you connected with a pro for your project. You can submit a service request on our website: http://www.homeadvisor.com/, or browse reviews for local water heater pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. We can also have a project advisor reach out to assist you if you send your contact information to [email protected] –HASupport
Wall thickness does not affect pipe or tubing size.[20] 1/2" L copper has the same outer diameter as 1/2" K or M copper. The same applies to pipe schedules. As a result, a slight increase in pressure losses is realized due to a decrease in flowpath as wall thickness is increased. In other words, 1 foot of 1/2" L copper has slightly less volume than 1 foot of 1/2 M copper.[citation needed]
Bacteria have been shown to live in "premises plumbing systems". The latter refers to the "pipes and fixtures within a building that transport water to taps after it is delivered by the utility".[34] Community water systems have been known for centuries to spread waterborne diseases like typhoid and cholera, however "opportunistic premises plumbing pathogens" have been recognized only more recently; Legionella pneumophila discovered in 1976, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most commonly tracked bacteria, which people with depressed immunity can inhale or ingest and may become infected with.[35] These opportunistic pathogens can grow for example in faucets, shower heads, water heaters and along pipe walls. Reasons that favor their growth are "high surface-to-volume ratio, intermittent stagnation, low disinfectant residual, and warming cycles". A high surface-to-volume ratio, i.e. a relatively large surface area allows the bacteria to form a biofilm, which protects them from disinfection.[35]
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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