Pro Plumbers

"We have found our plumber for life! Jim is awesome! We just bought a house with a leak in the foundation, and in spite of the complicated and extensive nature of the repairs needed, Jim quoted us an incredibly reasonable price. Having just closed on a house, though, we were extremely short on funds, and so to help us out, Jim did a temporary fix for much less, and even though he was going above and beyond and doing this extra work for us, he said he'd even deduct the cost of that repair from the total of the final, permanent repair, when we had that done!! I can't say enough good things about him - there's much more, but I don't have room!"
Plumbing is any system that conveys fluids for a wide range of applications. Plumbing uses pipes, valves, plumbing fixtures, tanks, and other apparatuses to convey fluids.[1] Heating and cooling (HVAC), waste removal, and potable water delivery are among the most common uses for plumbing, but it is not limited to these applications.[2] The word derives from the Latin for lead, plumbum, as the first effective pipes used in the Roman era were lead pipes.[3]

Accurate Leak & Line is specialized in the complete slab leak detection of sub-slab residential or commercial water and sewer piping systems. A combination of the best re-piping and Nu Flow relining repair options is offered to residential customers throughout the state. This wide variety of trenchless or traditional solutions allows our clientele to make the best decisions for their home and their pocketbook. Quality workmanship is always provided in a timely manner on all of our residential jobs, big or small.
Premier level plumbing solutions are right in your neighborhood. Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service is your local Evansville, IN plumber specializing in full-service solutions at honest, upfront prices. In fact, we are the only plumbing company in the area offering upfront pricing. This means no surprises at the end! Want to see what your neighbors think of our services? Click here to read their reviews.
Hello I had a plumber do an estimate for me to replace our copper pipes with plastic as we have no existing walls up in our basement yet...pretty basic job... so we figured we could upgrade as we do live in Northern Ontario and it does tend to get quite cold here in the winters.  We dont have any existing problems with our plumbing right now just figured it would be good time to do the job and perhaps change the pipes to 3 quarter inch for faster flow.  Well I never thought in all my life I would get an estimate back that would state $350.00 an hour in labor...yes that is correct $350.00 an hour...estimated 10 hours for the job to be completed.  So he quoted me $3500.00 for labor alone.. not supplies?  Well needless to say I will be happy with my half inch copper pipes and will happily wait for my bathtub to fill up at a slower pace.  Just wanted to know what your thoughts are on this $350.00 an hour quote?  Thank you and enjoy your day.
Not all plumbing companies can guarantee up-front pricing, superior workmanship and parts, licensed and insured plumbing contractors, and courteous support from uniformed professionals. Whether you are in need of drain cleaning or would like to schedule a plumbing inspection for your home, Mr. Rooter's plumbing services can handle it all! Our skilled plumbers are knowledgeable and equipped with the latest tools needed to achieve optimal results. Give us a call at (855) 982-2028, or request a job estimate online.
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
Let's start with the easiest possible project: Installing a new shower head is as simple as it gets. Typically, all you have to do is unscrew the old shower head from the shower arm (the pipe coming out of the wall), clean off the threads on the shower arm and wrap a bit of Teflon tape around it, then screw on the new shower head. It's really that simple (and if you don't believe me, check out the video above from Dummies.com). Do read the installation instructions on the shower head you buy, though. Some are designed not to require Teflon tape and can actually leak if you use it.
I called BL Plumbing when a small leak started coming out of my shower. They responded quickly and Billy arrived in the afternoon. He diagnosed the problem and proposed a solution including cost. I approved and he went straight to work. Within the hour, the problem was resolved. Billy recommended work that was needed to reduce water pressure for the entire house. I approved the work including cost and Billy had that problem fixed quickly and efficiently. A small leak in the pipe below the shower led to a much needed home improvement. As we finished, Billy and I discussed potential future work and issues regarding maintenance concerning the overall projects completed that day. The entire process was a very positive experience.
If your bathroom sink is slowly draining instead of holding water, your problem is super easy to fix. You likely just need to make a quick adjustment to the assembly under the sink. Pop-up drains have an arm that reaches down the drain and connects to a little rod. That rod sticks through the drain pipe and is held in place by a metal strip with holes in it. That strip, in turn, is connected to the little lever or handle you pull on to open and close the stopper. The video above from HomeAdditionPlus has an excellent look at how to make adjustments.
We contacted Best Plumbing Service of Cincinnati to have the sump pump and the outlet pipes checked as our basement flooded recently and we were not sure whether the sump pump malfunctioned or the outlet pipe was blocked. Both plumbers did a fantastic job looking over the system, diagnosing, and fixing the problem. They were extremely honest, courteous , and professional. We are very pleased with their outstanding service and would very highly recommend Best Plumbing Service of Cincinnati. M Effat
Baker Brothers Plumbing offers both residential and commercial plumbing services including tank and tankless water heater replacement and maintenance; drain and sewer repairs or replacement; drain cleaning, clearing and jetting; pipe lining and pipe replacement; repipe; gas line repair; slab leak detection and slab leak repair; bathroom and kitchen faucet installation; garbage disposal repair and installation; and most general plumbing repairs in most or all of the following Dallas, TX ZIP Codes: 75229, 75230, 75225, 75220, 75209, 75219, 75247, 75212, 75235, 75201, 75207, 75248, 75287, 75252, 75244, 75254, 75240, 75251, 75248-1713, 75214, 75228, 75243, 75238, 75218, 75206, 75231, 75204, 75226, 75246, 75227, 75208, 75217, 75232, 75224, 75211, 75241, 75215, 75233, 75253, 75216, 75223, 75237, 75249, 75203, 75210
Premier level plumbing solutions are right in your neighborhood. Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service is your local Evansville, IN plumber specializing in full-service solutions at honest, upfront prices. In fact, we are the only plumbing company in the area offering upfront pricing. This means no surprises at the end! Want to see what your neighbors think of our services? Click here to read their reviews.
Most plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters learn their trade through a 4- or 5-year apprenticeship. Apprentices typically receive 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job training, as well as some classroom instruction, each year. In the classroom, apprentices learn safety, local plumbing codes and regulations, and blueprint reading. They also study mathematics, applied physics, and chemistry. Apprenticeship programs are offered by unions and businesses. Although most workers enter apprenticeships directly, some start out as helpers. The Home Builders Institute offers a pre-apprenticeship training program in plumbing and other trades.
Most plumbers wont mess with the septic tank. We deal mostly with components inside the house. Did you have a vent pipe in the yard (often looks like a candy cane made of PVC) before the repair but not after? If all he did was replace the line it shouldn't cause a smell inside the house. All plumbing fixtures inside the house should have properly functioning traps. Those traps would create and maintain a water seal against the sewer gases. You should have at least one vent through the roof to equalize pressures within the drainage system. This prevents positive pressures within the system (caused by fixtures discharging into the lines, ie toilet flush) from pushing gas out through the traps, and negative pressures (the waste in line will pull air behind it like your finger over the end of a straw) from sucking water out of the traps.
PBT – flexible (usually gray or black) plastic pipe which is attached to barbed fittings and secured in place with a copper crimp ring. The primary manufacturer of PBT tubing and fittings was driven into bankruptcy by a class-action lawsuit over failures of this system.[citation needed] However, PB and PBT tubing has since returned to the market and codes, typically first for "exposed locations" such as risers.
For details about apprenticeship or other opportunities in this occupation, contact the offices of the state employment service; the state apprenticeship agency; local plumbing, heating, and cooling contractors or firms that employ fitters; or local union–management apprenticeship committees. Apprenticeship information is available from the U.S. Department of Labor's Apprenticeship program online, or by phone at 877-872-5627.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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