Pro Plumbers

Hello I had a plumber do an estimate for me to replace our copper pipes with plastic as we have no existing walls up in our basement yet...pretty basic job... so we figured we could upgrade as we do live in Northern Ontario and it does tend to get quite cold here in the winters.  We dont have any existing problems with our plumbing right now just figured it would be good time to do the job and perhaps change the pipes to 3 quarter inch for faster flow.  Well I never thought in all my life I would get an estimate back that would state $350.00 an hour in labor...yes that is correct $350.00 an hour...estimated 10 hours for the job to be completed.  So he quoted me $3500.00 for labor alone.. not supplies?  Well needless to say I will be happy with my half inch copper pipes and will happily wait for my bathtub to fill up at a slower pace.  Just wanted to know what your thoughts are on this $350.00 an hour quote?  Thank you and enjoy your day.
Also, you might run into a problem where the shower arm is too short or angled too sharply for the shower head you bought. This can happen more with the wand-type shower heads and the wall gets in the way of the wand. You can solve this problem by making sure you buy a shower head that fits or installing an extension arm onto the main shower arm. You can find those the same place you buy the shower heads.

Despite the Romans' common use of lead pipes, their aqueducts rarely poisoned people. Unlike other parts of the world where lead pipes cause poisoning, the Roman water had so much calcium in it that a layer of plaque prevented the water contacting the lead itself. What often causes confusion is the large amount of evidence of widespread lead poisoning, particularly amongst those who would have had easy access to piped water.[14] This was an unfortunate result of lead being used in cookware and as an additive to processed food and drink, for example as a preservative in wine.[15] Roman lead pipe inscriptions provided information on the owner to prevent water theft.


Plumbers are skilled professionals who are trained to install and maintain pipes and systems for drinking water, sewage and drainage. They usually have trained through four- to five-year training programs, which include apprenticeships, via trade schools and community colleges. Plumbers’ areas of expertise typically go beyond pipes to include mathematics, blueprint reading, plumbing codes and water distribution. They handle plumbing emergencies, such as broken pipes or clogged drains, and install and maintain everything from a new piping system to a replacement faucet. Plumbers also know how to install bathtubs and showers, toilets, water heaters and dishwashers. Plumbers may work on residential or commercial sites, sometimes designing and laying out a pipe system during construction.
This information is not intended as an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, a franchise. It is for information purposes only. Read More Currently, the following states regulate the offer and sale of franchises: California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. If you are a resident of or want to locate a franchise in one of these states, we will not offer you a franchise unless and until we have complied with applicable pre-sale registration and disclosure requirements in your state. Read Less Mr. Rooter is a registered trademark of Mr. Rooter LLC Copyright © 2017 Mr. Rooter, All rights reserved. All Mr. Rooter Plumbing Franchise Locations Are Independently Owned And Operated.
Clogged drains, water heater repair, sewer line replacement, faucet repair, toilet repair, sump pump replacement, sewer ejector pump replacement, tankless water heater installation, faucet replacement, garbage disposal replacement, water softener installation, water line repair, bathroom remodeling, gas line repair, drain cleaning, sewer cleaning, sewer video inspections, septic line repair, drain locating, leak locating, and more!
When a plumbing emergency happens, a plumber must be contacted immediately to help sort of the problem. A plumber who goes to a house that has a major water leak can turn off the water to help stop the home from being damaged further. This gives the homeowner a chance to begin cleaning up while the plumber gets to work handling the leak and getting the water turned back on. Any time when the home is being flooded, it is best for an emergency plumber to be called immediately.
Clogged drains, water heater repair, sewer line replacement, faucet repair, toilet repair, sump pump replacement, sewer ejector pump replacement, tankless water heater installation, faucet replacement, garbage disposal replacement, water softener installation, water line repair, bathroom remodeling, gas line repair, drain cleaning, sewer cleaning, sewer video inspections, septic line repair, drain locating, leak locating, and more!
No plumber is going to come right out and explain that they don’t have the required license to work for you. So if you know someone who is a great plumber, but they don’t have a license, hire them at your own risk. Licensed plumbers know the local building codes and regulations, have completed a certain amount of hours on the job and are insured. Want to become a master plumber yourself? Here are 28 tips.
Even the smallest issues with your heating or air conditioning can quickly become an emergency. If your furnace is failing to produce heat, or your air conditioner is blowing hot air, call the air conditioning and heating repair company that you can trust. With emergency service available 24/7 by our trusted technicians, keeping reliable cooling and heating is easy all year long.
Plumbing reached its early apex in ancient Rome, which saw the introduction of expansive systems of aqueducts, tile wastewater removal, and widespread use of lead pipes. With the Fall of Rome both water supply and sanitation stagnated—or regressed—for well over 1,000 years. Improvement was very slow, with little effective progress made until the growth of modern densely populated cities in the 1800s. During this period, public health authorities began pressing for better waste disposal systems to be installed, to prevent or control epidemics of disease. Earlier, the waste disposal system had merely consisted of collecting waste and dumping it on the ground or into a river. Eventually the development of separate, underground water and sewage systems eliminated open sewage ditches and cesspools.
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