Pro Plumbers

Robots won’t eat all the jobs, says Marco Zappacosta, the CEO and co-founder of Thumbtack, a marketplace for service professionals from plumbers to yoga teachers to personal trainers. — Carolyn Said, SFChronicle.com, "Why the robot apocalypse won’t kill all gig economy jobs," 16 June 2018 Most people will accept spending $80/hour on a plumber, but balk at putting a similar price tag on the value of their company’s website. — Jenny Knizner, USA TODAY, "Fundamentals of hiring a freelance designer for your business," 19 Mar. 2018 Then a team of plumbers begins restarting the system around St. Patrick’s Day, with the aim of having all outdoor water features back up and running by Memorial Day weekend. — Keith Williams, New York Times, "It’s Hot. How Do I Get the Spray Shower at the Park to Work?," 19 June 2018 The full-time employees losing their jobs include electricians, plumbers, carpenters and other skilled tradespeople needed to operate and maintain a large events venue. — James B. Nelson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Many long-time Bradley Center workers will not have jobs at the new Bucks arena," 11 May 2018 There are female plumbers, taxi-drivers and bartenders. — The Economist, "How a victorious Bashar al-Assad is changing Syria," 28 June 2018 That is a huge departure from construction sites, where unions representing plumbers, electricians, carpenters and various other trades each control their piece of the building process. — Conor Dougherty, New York Times, "Piece by Piece, a Factory-Made Answer for a Housing Squeeze," 7 June 2018 Ask any principal of a vocational school who is recruiting teachers who can prepare students for traditional jobs like auto mechanic, plumber, aviation mechanic and those needed for advanced manufacturing. — WSJ, "Time for Vocational Education Renaissance," 23 May 2018 The biggest violators, in Pakenham’s experience, are plumbers, electricians, and carpenters. — Elizabeth Royte, Daily Intelligencer, "George Pakenham is waging a one-man war on air pollution on the Upper West Side.," 10 July 2018
Hi Ginger, We're sorry you had this experience with a plumber in our network. Have you left the review for the company? We encourage homeowners to share their experiences so others have an honest idea of the company they are hiring. If you would like to speak with a rep regarding your concerns please reach out to [email protected] If you have a review you would like to submit please send it to [email protected] or visit this link: http://www.homeadvisor.com/write-a-review/. -HASupport
When you book a plumber, whether it's to fix a broken boiler or to unclog a drain, you want to know they're skilled enough for the task at hand. Nothing is worse than sending an amateur with a wrench to look at your pipes. Odds are, there will be more damage than when they started. All plumbers on the Handy platform are vetted, verified, and background checked way before they arrive at your home, so you can be sure that they're the right person for the job. 
When you need honest, reliable plumbing, heating, or cooling services in Northern Virginia, suburban Maryland, or throughout the D.C. area, look no further than My Plumber Heating and Cooling! We’re proud to be the region’s number one choice for home comfort since 1982. Whether you’re dealing with a broken air conditioner, outdated heating system, backed-up drain, or burst pipe, our highly trained team is ready to help. We offer everything from emergency plumbing repairs to new heating and air conditioning system installation to indoor air quality services and more. Most of all, we stand behind everything we do with extensive warranties and our 100% customer satisfaction guarantee. At My Plumber Heating and Cooling, your comfort is our priority! We have three convenient locations in Manassas, Fairfax, and Fredericksburg so that you don't have to wait to get the help you need.

Two-handle faucets are most often found in the bathroom, but you see them in some kitchens. Two-handle faucets use three types of mechanisms. The first two are the same as two of the mechanisms used in a single-handle faucet: cartridge and ceramic disc. The third type is a compression (or reverse-compression) mechanism. Compression faucets are the simplest type, using rubber washers that get compressed against one another to seal the valve. They do tend to wear out faster than other faucet types, but are also least expensive to repair.
Hello, long story. Toilet line stopped up two years ago. A company used high pressure water to clean line. Didnt work. Came back a second time with a plummer. Spouse was told that the line had collapsed, filled with rocks or tiles. Plummer then disconnected that line put in a second line, punched a hole in my tank, fed the new line in that hole. Now two years later, each heavy rain brings a strong sewer smell into the house. Found out later that there were no rocks or tiles in original line, only a large calcium build up over 25 years that had clogged the original line. I do not know if when the new line was put in, the old line was closed properly or if either line was or should be vented? I would like the original line reconnected and the newer line just removed. I plan then to repair the hole in septic tank where the new line entered with tar or concete. I need someone to fix my smelly home.
Let's start with the easiest possible project: Installing a new shower head is as simple as it gets. Typically, all you have to do is unscrew the old shower head from the shower arm (the pipe coming out of the wall), clean off the threads on the shower arm and wrap a bit of Teflon tape around it, then screw on the new shower head. It's really that simple (and if you don't believe me, check out the video above from Dummies.com). Do read the installation instructions on the shower head you buy, though. Some are designed not to require Teflon tape and can actually leak if you use it.
"We have found our plumber for life! Jim is awesome! We just bought a house with a leak in the foundation, and in spite of the complicated and extensive nature of the repairs needed, Jim quoted us an incredibly reasonable price. Having just closed on a house, though, we were extremely short on funds, and so to help us out, Jim did a temporary fix for much less, and even though he was going above and beyond and doing this extra work for us, he said he'd even deduct the cost of that repair from the total of the final, permanent repair, when we had that done!! I can't say enough good things about him - there's much more, but I don't have room!"

Hi Kenneth, We would be happy to get you connected with a pro for your project. You can submit a service request on our website: http://www.homeadvisor.com/, or browse reviews for local water heater pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. We can also have a project advisor reach out to assist you if you send your contact information to [email protected] –HASupport
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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