Pro Plumbers

Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
For over 24 years, PRO Plumbing Services has been a local, trusted family plumber, serving all of Douglas County and the surrounding areas including Castle Rock, Franktown, Elizabeth, Highland's Ranch, Sedalia, South Metro Denver, Front Range, and Parker. All of our employees are background checked and drug tested to ensure only trustworthy technicians are entering your home or business.
While it’s their job to make sure your pipes work like a well-oiled machine, it’s not their job to rebuild the wall they had to demolish to make that happen. So, while you’re going to get that water problem fixed, you’ll want to discuss in detail what kind of “mess” they might leave behind prior to the start of the project so you can plan accordingly. Remember, there are some jobs you can do yourself. Here’s how to solder copper pipe joints!

When you’re searching for a dependable Dallas plumber or Dallas plumbing company “near me” which offers licensed and trained plumbers for any plumbing repair or plumbing installation like water heaters, tankless heaters, garbage disposals, drain or sewer lines, water filtration, water softening or other plumbing needs, call 214-324-8811214-324-8811.
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters may use many different materials and construction techniques, depending on the type of project. Residential water systems, for example, use copper, steel, and plastic pipe that one or two plumbers can install. Power plant water systems, by contrast, are made of large steel pipes that usually take a crew of pipefitters to install. Some workers install stainless steel pipes on dairy farms and in factories, mainly to prevent contamination.
I had called Ben Franklin to fix a pin hole leak in the meter horn. Booking an appointment was very easy and the crew (Sid and Brandon) showed up on time. They quickly found out that a stop valve was not working and had to be replaced as well. Sid clearly explained my options and the charges upfront. He dealt with the city for water shut off, went about the job in a quick and efficient manner. Sid was very professional and explained clearly what he was doing. He patiently answered all my questions. Brandon was very practical and frank. As they were finishing up (I had to leave the house for an hour) they spotted a leak in another valve and fixed that also. I thought it was highly ethical of them to do so. Thank you Sid and Brandon!
Help! The toilet won’t stop running. It’s a bummer, sure, but it’s something you don’t need to call your plumber about. In fact, DIYers should take note that it’s a quick fix that will cost you just $5. For instance, your handle might just be sticking, which can be solved by spraying some lubricant where the handle meets the porcelain. Ready to DIY? Here’s how to fix a running toilet.
In addition to Trenchless Technology, Our licensed technicians and OSHA certified excavation crews specialize in traditional tunneling and sub-slab plumbing repair / replacement.  Detailed analysis and fixed cost proposals for repair are provided to customer upon completion of a hydrostatic pressure test and diagnostic slab leak testing, using a combination of cutting-edge pipelining techniques with traditional excavation to fix foundation leaks while minimizing digging and added expense.  Traditional tunnels or trenches for water line repair or sewer repair are hand dug by crews with confined space training.
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Cast iron and ductile iron pipe was long a lower-cost alternative to copper, before the advent of durable plastic materials but special non-conductive fittings must be used where transitions are to be made to other metallic pipes, except for terminal fittings, in order to avoid corrosion owing to electrochemical reactions between dissimilar metals (see galvanic cell).[17]
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