Pro Plumbers

Water heaters are tasked with heating the water that passes through the pipes to every shower, tub, and sink. These heaters are also supposed to heat water for the washing machine and dishwasher. These units can hold up for a long time, but may begin to cause problems over time. When the heater does not heat water properly all the time, leaks, or makes odd noises, homeowners will know that there is a problem. A water heater that begins to leak could start flooding the house at any moment. A water heater that makes odd sounds could be under pressure and about to burst. In each of these cases, it could be dangerous for the homeowner, and only a licensed Manhattan plumber can fix the problem or replace the water heater altogether.
Most plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters learn their trade through a 4- or 5-year apprenticeship. Apprentices typically receive 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job training, as well as some classroom instruction, each year. In the classroom, apprentices learn safety, local plumbing codes and regulations, and blueprint reading. They also study mathematics, applied physics, and chemistry. Apprenticeship programs are offered by unions and businesses. Although most workers enter apprenticeships directly, some start out as helpers. The Home Builders Institute offers a pre-apprenticeship training program in plumbing and other trades.

Despite the Romans' common use of lead pipes, their aqueducts rarely poisoned people. Unlike other parts of the world where lead pipes cause poisoning, the Roman water had so much calcium in it that a layer of plaque prevented the water contacting the lead itself. What often causes confusion is the large amount of evidence of widespread lead poisoning, particularly amongst those who would have had easy access to piped water.[14] This was an unfortunate result of lead being used in cookware and as an additive to processed food and drink, for example as a preservative in wine.[15] Roman lead pipe inscriptions provided information on the owner to prevent water theft.
Len The Plumber is a full service plumbing and drain cleaning company serving the entire Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area as well as Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Charles, Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, Loudoun, Prince William, Falls Church, Manassas, Delaware, Chester, New Castle, and Stafford counties. We are continuing to grow and expand our service areas so please continue to check-in to see if we are in your area and always feel free to call if you have a question. Our service area map shows all the counties and district that we currently serve.

Hello my name is Sam and I have been in the home renovation and remodeling business as well as swimming pools for over 25 years. I grew up in a family that owned skilled trade businesses. I possess abilities in all facets of the trades including but not limited to carpentry, plumbing, electrical, and more. I also have strong knowledge of home automation for lights and appliances.


Premier level plumbing solutions are right in your neighborhood. Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service is your local Evansville, IN plumber specializing in full-service solutions at honest, upfront prices. In fact, we are the only plumbing company in the area offering upfront pricing. This means no surprises at the end! Want to see what your neighbors think of our services? Click here to read their reviews.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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