Pro Plumbers

If you have questions about what parts to buy for your fixtures, the folks at the hardware store will most likely have an answer for you. Come equipped with the brand and model of your fixture and, even better, some pictures. They'll point you in the right direction. And if at any point you feel like you're in over your head, call a plumber. Even if you think you have the skills to do the job, there might be codes involved and you often need a permit.
If your bathroom sink is slowly draining instead of holding water, your problem is super easy to fix. You likely just need to make a quick adjustment to the assembly under the sink. Pop-up drains have an arm that reaches down the drain and connects to a little rod. That rod sticks through the drain pipe and is held in place by a metal strip with holes in it. That strip, in turn, is connected to the little lever or handle you pull on to open and close the stopper. The video above from HomeAdditionPlus has an excellent look at how to make adjustments.
Before you get involved with most plumbing projects, you'll need to shut off the water flowing to whatever you're working on. Most of the time, there are easy-to-access gate valves or compression valves that you can turn with your hand. Turn them clockwise all the way to turn off the water and counter-clockwise to turn it back on when you're done. For sinks, look under the sink and you'll usually see two valves—one for hot water and one for cold. On kitchen sinks, you might also see valves for the ice maker on your fridge or your dishwasher. Just turn them all off. For toilets, the valves are on the wall or right on the pipe behind the toilet.
We know that plumbing problems can be a real headache, which is why the team at Michael’s Plumbing Service is dedicated to not only providing efficient service but also helping you make informed decisions about essential plumbing issues. Customers who join the Michael's Club Service program receive 15% off all services, priority scheduling, no additional service charges or fees, and two annual water heater courtesy safety inspections. We invite you to learn more about us and what we do by watching a few of our videos!
The projects we've laid out here are particularly simple, but plumbing can be tricky, so if you're ever unsure, don't be afraid to ask for help. These projects are all pretty straightforward, but you never know what will come up, especially with older homes. We've selected some pretty good videos, but do some research and find some other videos if something about your setup looks a little different. The Internet is a wonderful thing.
Plumbers may not go out of their way to let you know that a toilet or sink can be moved. But if you’ve been working with them on a renovation, and they tell you something can’t be transferred to a new space, ask them to explain to you in detail why not. Speaking of things people don’t want to tell you, here are 10 things your neighbor isn’t being up-front about.
If there’s a plumbing problem in your home, Abacus Plumbing will fix it. Abacus plumbers are background-checked, highly trained, and state licensed; therefore, you’ll be getting a quality technician to service your home’s plumbing network. Abacus plumbers have years of experience repairing residential plumbing systems; there isn’t an issue they have not tackled, including:
No plumber is going to come right out and explain that they don’t have the required license to work for you. So if you know someone who is a great plumber, but they don’t have a license, hire them at your own risk. Licensed plumbers know the local building codes and regulations, have completed a certain amount of hours on the job and are insured. Want to become a master plumber yourself? Here are 28 tips.
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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