Pro Plumbers

Garbage disposers usually come with an Allen key. Find a good place to store it, and when the disposer jams, you can follow the directions in the owner’s manual to fix it yourself. It’s as simple as inserting and twisting, and doing this yourself will save you the hassle and cash of a service call to the plumber. Speaking of tool storage, check out these clever tool storage ideas.
“Central Penn Plumbing provided outstanding customer service. On a cold winter Saturday morning, we woke up to a very cold house. I gave Central Penn (Scott) a call and within an hour he had a service technician at our house to address the issue. Not only did they resolve the issue on the weekend, but Scott stopped by later in the week to ensure that things were still ok. Outstanding customer service. Thanks Central Penn Plumbing Services!”
plumbers must be asked directly what they charge hourly and if that is in addition to a service charge. The two are separate and I think they have gotten away with outrageous charges because of the potential of water damaging homeowner structures.   I had a plumber (not Home advisor) come and replace a part in my kitchen sink that was under warranty---the spray nozzle had been leaking...He charged me $85.00 for 15 minutes of work and I will never use Mr King again. 
If your bathroom sink is slowly draining instead of holding water, your problem is super easy to fix. You likely just need to make a quick adjustment to the assembly under the sink. Pop-up drains have an arm that reaches down the drain and connects to a little rod. That rod sticks through the drain pipe and is held in place by a metal strip with holes in it. That strip, in turn, is connected to the little lever or handle you pull on to open and close the stopper. The video above from HomeAdditionPlus has an excellent look at how to make adjustments.

The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.
If you need your leaky faucet repaired, don’t wait! Fill out the “Schedule Appointment” form or pick up the phone and call us today – we’ll have your leaky faucets fixed up in no time.  Our plumbing technicians service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The counties we service include the following: Baltimore County, Delaware County, New Castle County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Cecil County, Fairfax, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church and Manassas.
Hi Ginger, We're sorry you had this experience with a plumber in our network. Have you left the review for the company? We encourage homeowners to share their experiences so others have an honest idea of the company they are hiring. If you would like to speak with a rep regarding your concerns please reach out to [email protected] If you have a review you would like to submit please send it to [email protected] or visit this link: http://www.homeadvisor.com/write-a-review/. -HASupport
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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