Pro Plumbers

We strive in delivering top quality service to all of our customers. We want you happy and satisfied by the time we walk out your door. We will help locate your issue with a free estimate. Explain what the problem is and offer you our service to fix the problem.  You are not obligated to use us. We treat each customer friendly, professional and courtesy.

Some of the areas that we focus on include offers services in home plumbing needs where if you will be able to repair and remodel your home in Atlanta or suburban Atlanta, we offer you service in all these areas. From sink and faucet repair and replacement, depending on if you are looking for a new look or if you are looking to fix an existing a problem where your sink and faucet is leaking, we can help. We also specialize in toilet repair and replacement, as water-efficient toilets are beneficial to everyone and the environment.

Need a plumber to add to your network? There is one name in Evansville you can count on for 24/7 emergency help: Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service! Enjoy fast turnarounds, top notch workmanship, and competitive pricing. Everything we do is transparent so there are never any surprises. Call us today at (812) 618-9638 to discuss your plumbing needs and be on your way to better indoor comfort in no time!
It’s impossible to maintain your desired levels of comfort at home or work without the proper plumbing equipment. From hot showers and reliable kitchen appliances to properly flowing sewer lines and leak-free properties, the right plumbing system can keep you from dealing with a heap of plumbing headaches. Leave it to the plumbing professionals to ensure your equipment operates year-round.

The straight sections of plumbing systems are called "pipes" or "tubes". A pipe is typically formed via casting or welding, whereas a tube is made through extrusion. Pipe normally has thicker walls and may be threaded or welded, while tubing is thinner-walled and requires special joining techniques such as brazing, compression fitting, crimping, or for plastics, solvent welding. These joining techniques are discussed in more detail in the piping and plumbing fittings article.
Hi Kenneth, We would be happy to get you connected with a pro for your project. You can submit a service request on our website: http://www.homeadvisor.com/, or browse reviews for local water heater pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. We can also have a project advisor reach out to assist you if you send your contact information to [email protected] –HASupport
Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.
Todd did an amazing job, and fixed a problem that could of been devastating. Replacing a leaking water heater and also a replacing a failing, leaking main shut of valve. The possibility of major flooding was a real danger It was a 12 unit townhome which made the job even trickier, as water had to be shut off to the entire building while he fixed the valve. Todd, replaced them quickly and expertly, without a hitch. Plumbing repairs are never fun for a homeowner, but these people (especially Todd) do great work. It is definitely a weight lifted off my chest.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
×