Pro Plumbers

Rick’s Plumbing has been a mainstay within New Haven and Fairfield Counties since 1992. As a premier local plumbing service, we have been around for the community to complete any type of job – big or small. We only hire skilled professional plumbers to complete each task for our customers, ensuring the highest level of service is achieved within the shortest time possible. Whether you are looking for plumbing service or heating service, we’ve got you covered.
Hello I had a plumber do an estimate for me to replace our copper pipes with plastic as we have no existing walls up in our basement yet...pretty basic job... so we figured we could upgrade as we do live in Northern Ontario and it does tend to get quite cold here in the winters.  We dont have any existing problems with our plumbing right now just figured it would be good time to do the job and perhaps change the pipes to 3 quarter inch for faster flow.  Well I never thought in all my life I would get an estimate back that would state $350.00 an hour in labor...yes that is correct $350.00 an hour...estimated 10 hours for the job to be completed.  So he quoted me $3500.00 for labor alone.. not supplies?  Well needless to say I will be happy with my half inch copper pipes and will happily wait for my bathtub to fill up at a slower pace.  Just wanted to know what your thoughts are on this $350.00 an hour quote?  Thank you and enjoy your day.
Let's start with the easiest possible project: Installing a new shower head is as simple as it gets. Typically, all you have to do is unscrew the old shower head from the shower arm (the pipe coming out of the wall), clean off the threads on the shower arm and wrap a bit of Teflon tape around it, then screw on the new shower head. It's really that simple (and if you don't believe me, check out the video above from Dummies.com). Do read the installation instructions on the shower head you buy, though. Some are designed not to require Teflon tape and can actually leak if you use it.
When you book a plumber, whether it's to fix a broken boiler or to unclog a drain, you want to know they're skilled enough for the task at hand. Nothing is worse than sending an amateur with a wrench to look at your pipes. Odds are, there will be more damage than when they started. All plumbers on the Handy platform are vetted, verified, and background checked way before they arrive at your home, so you can be sure that they're the right person for the job. 

Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]

If your bathroom sink is slowly draining instead of holding water, your problem is super easy to fix. You likely just need to make a quick adjustment to the assembly under the sink. Pop-up drains have an arm that reaches down the drain and connects to a little rod. That rod sticks through the drain pipe and is held in place by a metal strip with holes in it. That strip, in turn, is connected to the little lever or handle you pull on to open and close the stopper. The video above from HomeAdditionPlus has an excellent look at how to make adjustments.
Before you get involved with most plumbing projects, you'll need to shut off the water flowing to whatever you're working on. Most of the time, there are easy-to-access gate valves or compression valves that you can turn with your hand. Turn them clockwise all the way to turn off the water and counter-clockwise to turn it back on when you're done. For sinks, look under the sink and you'll usually see two valves—one for hot water and one for cold. On kitchen sinks, you might also see valves for the ice maker on your fridge or your dishwasher. Just turn them all off. For toilets, the valves are on the wall or right on the pipe behind the toilet.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
For details about apprenticeship or other opportunities in this occupation, contact the offices of the state employment service; the state apprenticeship agency; local plumbing, heating, and cooling contractors or firms that employ fitters; or local union–management apprenticeship committees. Apprenticeship information is available from the U.S. Department of Labor's Apprenticeship program online, or by phone at 877-872-5627.
For the highest quality, expertise and excellent customer service you seek for all your plumbing repairs and plumbing installation needs, contact Baker Brothers Plumbing, Air Conditioning & Electrical at 214-324-8811214-324-8811 to schedule an appointment. Our licensed Dallas Plumbing technicians are background checked and drug-screened, ready to provide you with the best possible service in the DFW metroplex.
If there’s a plumbing problem in your home, Abacus Plumbing will fix it. Abacus plumbers are background-checked, highly trained, and state licensed; therefore, you’ll be getting a quality technician to service your home’s plumbing network. Abacus plumbers have years of experience repairing residential plumbing systems; there isn’t an issue they have not tackled, including:
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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