Pro Plumbers

The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.
If you need your leaky faucet repaired, don’t wait! Fill out the “Schedule Appointment” form or pick up the phone and call us today – we’ll have your leaky faucets fixed up in no time.  Our plumbing technicians service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The counties we service include the following: Baltimore County, Delaware County, New Castle County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Cecil County, Fairfax, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church and Manassas.

If you need your leaky faucet repaired, don’t wait! Fill out the “Schedule Appointment” form or pick up the phone and call us today – we’ll have your leaky faucets fixed up in no time.  Our plumbing technicians service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The counties we service include the following: Baltimore County, Delaware County, New Castle County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Cecil County, Fairfax, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church and Manassas.


For the past 30+ years, BEST Plumbing Service of Cincinnati has served the area by providing the highest quality plumbing repairs and installations throughout the entire area. Our Cincinnati plumbing company, based in Loveland, takes pride in being a family-owned and locally-operated business. Whether your sewer lines, water lines, faucets, drains or toilets need servicing, our team is equipped with the best knowledge and experience to get the issues fixed fast and quick. Our licensed and experienced plumbers are always on standby when duty calls.
Hello, long story. Toilet line stopped up two years ago. A company used high pressure water to clean line. Didnt work. Came back a second time with a plummer. Spouse was told that the line had collapsed, filled with rocks or tiles. Plummer then disconnected that line put in a second line, punched a hole in my tank, fed the new line in that hole. Now two years later, each heavy rain brings a strong sewer smell into the house. Found out later that there were no rocks or tiles in original line, only a large calcium build up over 25 years that had clogged the original line. I do not know if when the new line was put in, the old line was closed properly or if either line was or should be vented? I would like the original line reconnected and the newer line just removed. I plan then to repair the hole in septic tank where the new line entered with tar or concete. I need someone to fix my smelly home.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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