Pro Plumbers

Sometimes a faucet leak can be stopped by replacing the rubber washer at the end of a faucet stem or cartridge.  This is a more common repair on older fixtures when things were built to last and designed to be able to be maintained.  Other times the whole stem or cartridge needs replacement or the bibb seat deeper back into the fixture needs replacement.  That leads to matching up the right components and often times making a trip to the hardware store or plumbing supply house necessary due to the many varieties, makes and models of faucets.  My advice is to make sure your Plumber has faucet repair kit on their truck before having them come out to assess the issue.
I used Go Green Express Home Services for a minor plastic pipe repair under my kitchen sink...The worker did a great job fixing this minor pipe plastic pipe repair( my original pipe was too short and he needed to extended the pipe and then reconnect). It took him less than 10 minutes to fix. I was first quoted $125 +tax but when the worker went to his truck and spoke to whoever he spoke to at the office, the price rose to $155.10 +tax for a total of $167.10...I thought that was a little too high. Will I use this company again, I Don't Know. It would be helpful if they would have a set price list for jobs (minor repairs, Major repairs etc...), then you as the consumer can see beforehand what the cost maybe and work from there with the company. Minor repairs, Major repairs this company should at least have a set-price list. ..The worker was great and efficient and did a good job on the repair but their prices are a bit costly. And yes, I did write this in their review.

"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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