Pro Plumbers

If there’s a plumbing problem in your home, Abacus Plumbing will fix it. Abacus plumbers are background-checked, highly trained, and state licensed; therefore, you’ll be getting a quality technician to service your home’s plumbing network. Abacus plumbers have years of experience repairing residential plumbing systems; there isn’t an issue they have not tackled, including:
Toilets – Sometimes toilet drains are overwhelmed with toilet paper or clogged by non-flushable items that find their way into the drain. Roto-Rooter can clear any toilet drain to restore full drainage and powerful flushes. Our skilled plumbers can also fix problems related to running toilets, leaking toilets, broken tanks and bowls, and toilets that don’t flush properly.
With over 20 years in the business, we can confidently say we are the best plumber in Fort Worth. We offer reliable plumbing solutions efficiently and at affordable prices. Our satisfaction guarantee ensures that our customers are always completely happy with our services. However, our word only means so much. We appreciate our customers and the community we serve and are flattered that they feel the same way about our team of Fort Worth plumbers. Peruse our customer reviews below to find out why we are the best solution for your home or business and then contact us for a free on-site estimate.
Accurate Leak & Line is specialized in the complete slab leak detection of sub-slab residential or commercial water and sewer piping systems. A combination of the best re-piping and Nu Flow relining repair options is offered to residential customers throughout the state. This wide variety of trenchless or traditional solutions allows our clientele to make the best decisions for their home and their pocketbook. Quality workmanship is always provided in a timely manner on all of our residential jobs, big or small.
Clogged drains are no fun. We've shown you several ways to clear a clogged drain and how to clear a blocked P-trap under a sink, but bathtub drains can be a little more challenging. A lot more hair and other gunk goes down them than you think. Add to this the fact that most bathtub drains take a 90-degree turn that makes getting a drain snake down them more difficult.
Help! The toilet won’t stop running. It’s a bummer, sure, but it’s something you don’t need to call your plumber about. In fact, DIYers should take note that it’s a quick fix that will cost you just $5. For instance, your handle might just be sticking, which can be solved by spraying some lubricant where the handle meets the porcelain. Ready to DIY? Here’s how to fix a running toilet.

My Mom is in her eightys. I called a plumber in Aug 2012, replaced the McDonnell/Miller LWCO low water cut off 47/2 $675.. Same plumber was called Jan 8,2013 back. He trouble shoot the problem and replaced the same unit, yet I still have the problem. After the heat come on for about 15 mins/ goes off.the pipes connecting to the MM LOCO the vibrating starts, shakes, and makes a loud noise. The boiler is steam, I know it's old. Do I call the same plumber or call someone differently?
Alexa is an experienced lifestyle and news writer, currently working with Reader's Digest, Shape Magazine, and various other publications. She loves writing about her travels, health, wellness, home decor, food and drink, fashion, beauty, and scientific news. Follow her traveling adventures on Instagram: @living_by_lex, send her a message: [email protected], and check out her website: livingbylex.com
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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