Pro Plumbers

At Len The Plumber, we’ve seen it all when it comes to leaky faucets. Let’s face it – your faucets are some of the most frequently used appliances in your home. All that wear and tear is bound to catch up with them at some point! That’s why we offer fast, full-service faucet repair and replacement in the Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia area seven days a week. Call us today if you need:
Hello! My name is Lorinn and I am 26 years old. I have been working in different construction trades for 8+ years now. To name a few I am a skilled in flooring, cabinets/closets, and electrical(fans, fixtures, etc). I’ve gotten as experienced as I am because I genuinely enjoy working with my hands and learning new things. I take pride in my work, and love exceeding peoples expectations.

The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.


The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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