Pro Plumbers

Steve Huffman of Steve's Plumbing Service has made more than one service call to my house. Each time I have been more than pleased with his job. He responds relatively soon to a call. He is a fast and neat worker, at the same time a very efficient and neat worker. He never leaves a mess but cleans up thoroughly when the job is finished. His prices are very reasonable. I do not hesitate to recommend him to my family and close friends.
Hello I had a plumber do an estimate for me to replace our copper pipes with plastic as we have no existing walls up in our basement yet...pretty basic job... so we figured we could upgrade as we do live in Northern Ontario and it does tend to get quite cold here in the winters.  We dont have any existing problems with our plumbing right now just figured it would be good time to do the job and perhaps change the pipes to 3 quarter inch for faster flow.  Well I never thought in all my life I would get an estimate back that would state $350.00 an hour in labor...yes that is correct $350.00 an hour...estimated 10 hours for the job to be completed.  So he quoted me $3500.00 for labor alone.. not supplies?  Well needless to say I will be happy with my half inch copper pipes and will happily wait for my bathtub to fill up at a slower pace.  Just wanted to know what your thoughts are on this $350.00 an hour quote?  Thank you and enjoy your day.
The difference between pipes and tubes is simply in the way it is sized. PVC pipe for plumbing applications and galvanized steel pipe for instance, are measured in IPS (iron pipe size). Copper tube, CPVC, PeX and other tubing is measured nominally, which is basically an average diameter. These sizing schemes allow for universal adaptation of transitional fittings. For instance, 1/2" PeX tubing is the same size as 1/2" copper tubing. 1/2" PVC on the other hand is not the same size as 1/2" tubing, and therefore requires either a threaded male or female adapter to connect them. When used in agricultural irrigation, the singular form "pipe" is often used as a plural.[19]
"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.

The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.

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