Pro Plumbers

If you need your leaky faucet repaired, don’t wait! Fill out the “Schedule Appointment” form or pick up the phone and call us today – we’ll have your leaky faucets fixed up in no time.  Our plumbing technicians service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The counties we service include the following: Baltimore County, Delaware County, New Castle County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Cecil County, Fairfax, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church and Manassas.

Plumbers install and repair water, drainage, gas, and other piping systems in homes, businesses, and factories. Plumbers install plumbing fixtures such as bathtubs and toilets, and appliances, such as dishwashers and water heaters. Plumbers also maintain septic systems—the large, underground holding tanks that collect waste from houses that are not connected to a sewer system.
For over 24 years, PRO Plumbing Services has been a local, trusted family plumber, serving all of Douglas County and the surrounding areas including Castle Rock, Franktown, Elizabeth, Highland's Ranch, Sedalia, South Metro Denver, Front Range, and Parker. All of our employees are background checked and drug tested to ensure only trustworthy technicians are entering your home or business.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]

Len The Plumber is a full service plumbing and drain cleaning company serving the entire Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area as well as Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Charles, Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, Loudoun, Prince William, Falls Church, Manassas, Delaware, Chester, New Castle, and Stafford counties. We are continuing to grow and expand our service areas so please continue to check-in to see if we are in your area and always feel free to call if you have a question. Our service area map shows all the counties and district that we currently serve.
Let's start with the easiest possible project: Installing a new shower head is as simple as it gets. Typically, all you have to do is unscrew the old shower head from the shower arm (the pipe coming out of the wall), clean off the threads on the shower arm and wrap a bit of Teflon tape around it, then screw on the new shower head. It's really that simple (and if you don't believe me, check out the video above from Dummies.com). Do read the installation instructions on the shower head you buy, though. Some are designed not to require Teflon tape and can actually leak if you use it.
Many commercial properties face the same plumbing problems as residential buildings. Usually, the plumbing system is much larger and more complex. The effects of plumbing problems can be much more extensive for commercial buildings, as they can interrupt business and impact profits. So it’s critical that you have a plumbing company you can trust when problems strike to minimize disruption to your operations.
Most large cities today pipe solid wastes to sewage treatment plants in order to separate and partially purify the water, before emptying into streams or other bodies of water. For potable water use, galvanized iron piping was commonplace in the United States from the late 1800s until around 1960. After that period, copper piping took over, first soft copper with flared fittings, then with rigid copper tubing utilizing soldered fittings.
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