Pro Plumbers

Two-handle faucets are most often found in the bathroom, but you see them in some kitchens. Two-handle faucets use three types of mechanisms. The first two are the same as two of the mechanisms used in a single-handle faucet: cartridge and ceramic disc. The third type is a compression (or reverse-compression) mechanism. Compression faucets are the simplest type, using rubber washers that get compressed against one another to seal the valve. They do tend to wear out faster than other faucet types, but are also least expensive to repair.
When a plumbing emergency happens, a plumber must be contacted immediately to help sort of the problem. A plumber who goes to a house that has a major water leak can turn off the water to help stop the home from being damaged further. This gives the homeowner a chance to begin cleaning up while the plumber gets to work handling the leak and getting the water turned back on. Any time when the home is being flooded, it is best for an emergency plumber to be called immediately.
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Montreal and Boston in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
While you might be tempted to get out your wrench and try and fix those plumbing fixtures, plumbing can be a lot more complicated than you might think. In the wrong hands, even the simplest-seeming of plumbing jobs can quickly become something disastrous or costly. The chances are that, whatever your problem is, your plumber has seen it before and will be able to rectify the situation, quickly and efficiently. Why run the risk of turning a simple job into a plumbing catastrophe, when you can book plumbing services through Handy to nip it in the bud?
If you need your leaky faucet repaired, don’t wait! Fill out the “Schedule Appointment” form or pick up the phone and call us today – we’ll have your leaky faucets fixed up in no time.  Our plumbing technicians service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The counties we service include the following: Baltimore County, Delaware County, New Castle County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Cecil County, Fairfax, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church and Manassas.
When you need plumbing repair our plumbers will be at you residence quickly if you live in Zip Codes 75050, 75051, 75052, 75053, 75054, which we serve. There are many reasons you would need a good plumber. Your toilet might be backed up or your sewer may be overflowing. Whether you need help to repair leaks in the kitchen, bathroom or shower, our plumbing service is one of the fastest in town and one that most people call if they need help quickly. Easy accessibility is critical when you need help urgently, which could happen for example if you have a serious water leak, or sewage backup.

Plumbers on the Handy platform have experience in fixing all the common (and uncommon) plumbing problems that plague homes. Whether you’ve got a water heater leaking, a clogged toilet, or a blocked drain, chances are that your plumber will have seen and dealt with a similar job before. When you use the Handy app or website, you’ll be connected to experienced plumbers who’ll know exactly what to do, no matter how big or small the job might be.
PVC/CPVC – rigid plastic pipes similar to PVC drain pipes but with thicker walls to deal with municipal water pressure, introduced around 1970. PVC stands for polyvinyl chloride, and it has become a common replacement for metal piping. PVC should be used only for cold water, or for venting. CPVC can be used for hot and cold potable water supply. Connections are made with primers and solvent cements as required by code.[22]
PBT – flexible (usually gray or black) plastic pipe which is attached to barbed fittings and secured in place with a copper crimp ring. The primary manufacturer of PBT tubing and fittings was driven into bankruptcy by a class-action lawsuit over failures of this system.[citation needed] However, PB and PBT tubing has since returned to the market and codes, typically first for "exposed locations" such as risers.
Cast iron and ductile iron pipe was long a lower-cost alternative to copper, before the advent of durable plastic materials but special non-conductive fittings must be used where transitions are to be made to other metallic pipes, except for terminal fittings, in order to avoid corrosion owing to electrochemical reactions between dissimilar metals (see galvanic cell).[17]
I had called Ben Franklin to fix a pin hole leak in the meter horn. Booking an appointment was very easy and the crew (Sid and Brandon) showed up on time. They quickly found out that a stop valve was not working and had to be replaced as well. Sid clearly explained my options and the charges upfront. He dealt with the city for water shut off, went about the job in a quick and efficient manner. Sid was very professional and explained clearly what he was doing. He patiently answered all my questions. Brandon was very practical and frank. As they were finishing up (I had to leave the house for an hour) they spotted a leak in another valve and fixed that also. I thought it was highly ethical of them to do so. Thank you Sid and Brandon!
My Mom is in her eightys. I called a plumber in Aug 2012, replaced the McDonnell/Miller LWCO low water cut off 47/2 $675.. Same plumber was called Jan 8,2013 back. He trouble shoot the problem and replaced the same unit, yet I still have the problem. After the heat come on for about 15 mins/ goes off.the pipes connecting to the MM LOCO the vibrating starts, shakes, and makes a loud noise. The boiler is steam, I know it's old. Do I call the same plumber or call someone differently?
When a person has a blockage in their sewage system they often try to fix it themselves by adding an acid or a base such as Drano in an attempt to dissolve or dislodge the problem. These chemicals can get into the plumbers eyes [14]when the sewage is splashed during the repair. The plumbers skin during the repair does come into contact with the sewage water.[15] The owner of the toilet might not report to the plumber they have already tried Drano a highly caustic base .
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