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The Oatey 8 oz. Handy Pack Purple Primer The Oatey 8 oz. Handy Pack Purple Primer and Solvent Cement contains code-listed primer and solvent cement needed for solvent-welding PVC pipe and fittings. Can be used with up to 4 in. Dia piping. Convenient Handy Pack for storage - just add pipe and fittings. Due to the nature of ...  More + Product Details Close
It’s time you receive the exceptional plumbing services you deserve. Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service is here for you 24/7 with the right solution. Know what to expect with our upfront pricing method, honest recommendations, and transparent way of doing business. Call us today at (812) 618-9638 for your free estimate (available during our regular business hours).
The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.
If you need your leaky faucet repaired, don’t wait! Fill out the “Schedule Appointment” form or pick up the phone and call us today – we’ll have your leaky faucets fixed up in no time.  Our plumbing technicians service Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area.  The counties we service include the following: Baltimore County, Delaware County, New Castle County, Chester County, Stafford County, Fredericksburg County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, Anne Arundel County, Harford County, Carroll County, Cecil County, Fairfax, Fairfax City, Alexandria, Arlington County, Loudon County, Prince William County, Falls Church and Manassas.
If you have a major fix in your home, it’s important to shop around for a plumber to do the work. At least three bids will help you determine the range of the project, so you can weigh the pros and cons of price and the reputation of the plumbers. Get references and contact them. Also, a good plumber isn’t likely to nickel and dime you. For the smaller jobs, check out these 11 plumbing tricks.
 CON'T FROM COMMENTS EARLIER.  However,  the  installation took less than 3/4/ hour and was a basic regulator with no other function.  Looking up the price afterwards, invoice did not list type or price, it appears that it would have cost me around $60 for the regulator and another $15 or so for the additional supplies necessary to install it and it was really a rather simple job with easy access.    Given that, it seems that $300 for less that  an hours worth of on site work,  company says it does not include commute time in its prices, is a little high.  While flat rate quotes are nice, they must take into consideration situations where the work load differs depending on the circumstances.  Therefore, unless you are at the upper end of the harder work needed than the average job. it can be argued that my estimated price of $300 for labor was more than a little high.  Maybe I am wrong since I have not used their services for years and  am not knowledgeable of the costs of equipment and professional labor today.  

Your plumbing service call will begin with a thorough examination of the trouble; then our technician will spend time explaining the problem and outlining your repair options. Our experts will help you evaluate your choices and make the one that’s right for you. We offer you an in-depth review of products and repair techniques so you can make informed decisions on your plumbing needs.
Think that by calling for plumbing services you will have to clean up after the work is done? Not when you work with us! At Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service, our uniformed plumbers arrive at your door with shoe covers and are conscious of the cleanliness of the work area. In fact, once the job is done, you won’t be able to tell we were even there! That’s how clean we leave your property. There is no mess for you to clean up, so you can get back to your normal routine without hassle.
I think it is rather rude and a bit dishonest for people to not divulge their total fees upfront, an of course we should know to ask. But the normal person wouldn't know the questions to ask until they are burnt once like this, and then there still could be costs for walking up stairs or charge another service call if they need to go somewhere to use the bathroom and come back. THAT ISN'T A QUESTION I WOULD THINK TO ASK.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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