Pro Plumbers

If left unfixed, a running toilet or a leaky faucet can end up costing you hundreds of dollars. Check out your water bill and how your water is running. If you find your kitchen dripping non-stop and your water bill going higher, you may have a leak! Let Parker & Sons put a stop to those leaks. Our team of expert plumbers will make sure to get the work done faster, get it right the first time, and do it efficiently.
I thought that my sump pump had ended its life and needed to be replaced. The contractor I found through Home Adviser came out the following day and arrived reasonably promptly.  The technician tested the pump and it wasn't responding. He then checked the  breaker panel and all seemed well. However he checked to see if power was reaching the outlet, it wasn't so he tripped some breakers and reset them and the power to my pump came on and the pump works so a replacement wasn't necessary. He charged $75.00 which I think was reasonable for a call-out fee and time spent.
In addition to Trenchless Technology, Our licensed technicians and OSHA certified excavation crews specialize in traditional tunneling and sub-slab plumbing repair / replacement.  Detailed analysis and fixed cost proposals for repair are provided to customer upon completion of a hydrostatic pressure test and diagnostic slab leak testing, using a combination of cutting-edge pipelining techniques with traditional excavation to fix foundation leaks while minimizing digging and added expense.  Traditional tunnels or trenches for water line repair or sewer repair are hand dug by crews with confined space training.
There’s often an Allen wrench that comes with the garbage disposal. I keep it under the sink. When the thing jams, follow the directions in the manual, and I won’t need to come out. Another plumbing tip, don’t believe the myth about putting lemon peels in the disposal to make it smell better. That will just make it jam faster.  These are the things you should never pour down the drain.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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