Pro Plumbers

Although needing emergency service for anything is never fun, if its plumbing service you ned I’d recommend Ben Franklin. The customer service person that took my call was courteous and professional. The service technician arrived well within the appointment time window. He was also courteous and professional. He understood my issue and explained what service was needed and what it would cost. He fixed the problem, cleaned up any debris that occurred during his work. We did the paperwork, he asked if I had any questions and then gave me his contact information in case I needed to call. You can’t beat that! Thanks!

Many commercial properties face the same plumbing problems as residential buildings. Usually, the plumbing system is much larger and more complex. The effects of plumbing problems can be much more extensive for commercial buildings, as they can interrupt business and impact profits. So it’s critical that you have a plumbing company you can trust when problems strike to minimize disruption to your operations.
No matter what your plumbing needs, you can count on Benjamin Franklin Plumbing® to provide you with quality professional plumbing services. No job is too big or too small - from the leaky toilet, to the bursting sewer pipe in the front yard - we fix it all!  Whether you need new plumbing equipment installed or existing equipment repaired, we’re here to help.  We offer a full range of plumbing services, including installation, repair or replacement.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
×