Pro Plumbers

Plumbing is any system that conveys fluids for a wide range of applications. Plumbing uses pipes, valves, plumbing fixtures, tanks, and other apparatuses to convey fluids.[1] Heating and cooling (HVAC), waste removal, and potable water delivery are among the most common uses for plumbing, but it is not limited to these applications.[2] The word derives from the Latin for lead, plumbum, as the first effective pipes used in the Roman era were lead pipes.[3]

Leaky faucets are more than just a minor inconvenience. All that dripping water can corrode your sink and drain basins, wear away at your pipes and waste hundreds of gallons per year! Don’t let this happen to you – call our friendly Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia plumbing technicians for faucet repair today!


Most plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters learn their trade through a 4- or 5-year apprenticeship. Apprentices typically receive 2,000 hours of paid on-the-job training, as well as some classroom instruction, each year. In the classroom, apprentices learn safety, local plumbing codes and regulations, and blueprint reading. They also study mathematics, applied physics, and chemistry. Apprenticeship programs are offered by unions and businesses. Although most workers enter apprenticeships directly, some start out as helpers. The Home Builders Institute offers a pre-apprenticeship training program in plumbing and other trades.
Even the smallest issues with your heating or air conditioning can quickly become an emergency. If your furnace is failing to produce heat, or your air conditioner is blowing hot air, call the air conditioning and heating repair company that you can trust. With emergency service available 24/7 by our trusted technicians, keeping reliable cooling and heating is easy all year long.
Owning a home is an exciting adventure. Homeownership brings family, comfort, and memories. But along with the good times, you have to put up with the occasional interruptions. Plumbing problems are a natural part of life and a necessary evil. They will happen, and when they do, you should be prepared with a reliable solution. Texas Plumbing Repair is your go-to full-service plumbing company who specializes in home and business plumbing projects of every size and kind.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Before starting any work, we study the issue and perform comprehensive inspections to properly diagnose the problem. Once we have pinpointed the source of the issue, we will discuss your options with you. We try to stick to repairs if possible, and avoid recommending replacements unless your system or unit is extremely outdated. By focusing on repairs instead of replacement, you save money and enjoy an improved plumbing unit for many more years to come.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
×