Pro Plumbers

Pipe is available in rigid "joints", which come in various lengths depending on the material. Tubing, in particular copper, comes in rigid hard tempered "joints" or soft tempered (annealed) rolls. PeX and CPVC tubing also comes in rigid "joints" or flexible rolls. The temper of the copper, that is whether it is a rigid "joint" or flexible roll, does not affect the sizing.[19]
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
Some of the areas that we focus on include offers services in home plumbing needs where if you will be able to repair and remodel your home in Atlanta or suburban Atlanta, we offer you service in all these areas. From sink and faucet repair and replacement, depending on if you are looking for a new look or if you are looking to fix an existing a problem where your sink and faucet is leaking, we can help. We also specialize in toilet repair and replacement, as water-efficient toilets are beneficial to everyone and the environment.
When a plumbing emergency strikes, you need dependable and quick service from a licensed, reputable Dallas plumber. Regardless of whether your emergency is a burst pipe that is causing water to flood into your home, a sewer line clog resulting in a backup of wastewater, or a gas leak; you can rely on a fast response from the licensed professionals at Baker Brothers Plumbing, Air Conditioning & Electrical. Our technicians are on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
For over 24 years, PRO Plumbing Services has been a local, trusted family plumber, serving all of Douglas County and the surrounding areas including Castle Rock, Franktown, Elizabeth, Highland's Ranch, Sedalia, South Metro Denver, Front Range, and Parker. All of our employees are background checked and drug tested to ensure only trustworthy technicians are entering your home or business.

Plumbers are skilled professionals who are trained to install and maintain pipes and systems for drinking water, sewage and drainage. They usually have trained through four- to five-year training programs, which include apprenticeships, via trade schools and community colleges. Plumbers’ areas of expertise typically go beyond pipes to include mathematics, blueprint reading, plumbing codes and water distribution. They handle plumbing emergencies, such as broken pipes or clogged drains, and install and maintain everything from a new piping system to a replacement faucet. Plumbers also know how to install bathtubs and showers, toilets, water heaters and dishwashers. Plumbers may work on residential or commercial sites, sometimes designing and laying out a pipe system during construction.
Before you get involved with most plumbing projects, you'll need to shut off the water flowing to whatever you're working on. Most of the time, there are easy-to-access gate valves or compression valves that you can turn with your hand. Turn them clockwise all the way to turn off the water and counter-clockwise to turn it back on when you're done. For sinks, look under the sink and you'll usually see two valves—one for hot water and one for cold. On kitchen sinks, you might also see valves for the ice maker on your fridge or your dishwasher. Just turn them all off. For toilets, the valves are on the wall or right on the pipe behind the toilet.
"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.
Sometimes a faucet leak can be stopped by replacing the rubber washer at the end of a faucet stem or cartridge.  This is a more common repair on older fixtures when things were built to last and designed to be able to be maintained.  Other times the whole stem or cartridge needs replacement or the bibb seat deeper back into the fixture needs replacement.  That leads to matching up the right components and often times making a trip to the hardware store or plumbing supply house necessary due to the many varieties, makes and models of faucets.  My advice is to make sure your Plumber has faucet repair kit on their truck before having them come out to assess the issue.
Instead, you will be guided every step of the way. A friendly representative will greet you at your first phone call and work with you to schedule a convenient appointment time. Our plumbers take the time to listen to your concerns, address all of your questions, and make sure you receive the type of service you expect. This leaves no room for surprises.
Help! The toilet won’t stop running. It’s a bummer, sure, but it’s something you don’t need to call your plumber about. In fact, DIYers should take note that it’s a quick fix that will cost you just $5. For instance, your handle might just be sticking, which can be solved by spraying some lubricant where the handle meets the porcelain. Ready to DIY? Here’s how to fix a running toilet.
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
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