Pro Plumbers

We've talked before about home electrical projects you can handle on your own and now it's time to tackle plumbing. The projects we're covering here mostly deal with repairing things like running toilets and leaky faucets, and replacing fixtures like faucets and shower heads. These are beginner-level projects that are fairly easy to do and can save you a lot of money if you tackle them yourself.
Curtis did an excellent job in identifying the problem and providing a couple solutions. We discussed both and came to a mutual agreement, rather than him explicitly saying this is the only option and charge excessive amount. Curtis was very easy to talk to; even though I had lots of questions he was very professional throughout. He was prompt to the appointment, although I forgot about the time, he reached out and waited until I arrive. I would highly recommend their services for your plumbing needs!
In addition to Trenchless Technology, Our licensed technicians and OSHA certified excavation crews specialize in traditional tunneling and sub-slab plumbing repair / replacement.  Detailed analysis and fixed cost proposals for repair are provided to customer upon completion of a hydrostatic pressure test and diagnostic slab leak testing, using a combination of cutting-edge pipelining techniques with traditional excavation to fix foundation leaks while minimizing digging and added expense.  Traditional tunnels or trenches for water line repair or sewer repair are hand dug by crews with confined space training.

With experience and expertise, your plumber will be able to inspect your plumbing fixtures and identify where any problems may have originated. With the right tools on hand, they’ll be able to fix the problem, right there and then. If your water heater has  triggered a full-blown flood, they’ll know exactly how and where to shut off the water supply. Should the flood be the result of a burst pipe, they’ll be able to change it before it can do any additional damage. Plumbers know a lot about their craft that we do not, and the Handy platform gives you the opportunity to book them and benefit from their knowledge and ability.

Mr. Rooter® Plumbing is the go-to plumber for homeowners across the country. Why? Our plumbing contractors provide courteous, friendly, affordable, and effective residential plumbing services. We take our mission to exceed our customers’ expectations seriously! From on-time arrivals to licensed and certified plumbing experts, we make sure homeowners are getting the very best plumbing services. You can have total peace of mind and confidence when you call on us! We stand behind our work and go the extra mile to get the job done quickly so you can get back to enjoying your home.
"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.

When you have a plumbing issue that needs professional attention, look no further than Handy. No matter how skilled you might be at home maintenance, some jobs should only ever be tackled by a professional, and plumbing is one of them. When you book a plumber through the Handy platform, you'll be booking a plumbing professional you will know just where to look to find the source of the problem and who will have all the right tools and expertise to fix it. 


Pipefitters, sometimes simply called fitters, install and maintain pipes that carry chemicals, acids, and gases. These pipes are used mostly in manufacturing, commercial, and industrial settings. Fitters install and repair pipe systems in power plants, as well as heating and cooling systems in large office buildings. Some pipefitters specialize as gasfitters, sprinklerfitters, or steamfitters.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
It’s a family event in late October when many American households carve a pumpkin into a Halloween jack-o-lantern. The kids delight in the whole process, especially when mom and dad let junior scoop the pumpkin pulp out of the pumpkin. But what happens next is the scary part. Often, those slimy pumpkin guts are pushed down the sink drain then the disposal is turned on to chop it into tiny bits before the water washes it away. Except, it doesn’t quite ... Read More >
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
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