Pro Plumbers

Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[25] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[26]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[27] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[28] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[27] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[29][30]
“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.
A plumber’s reputation depends on your satisfaction. As a result, any plumbing service professionals you book through Handy will take their responsibility to you very seriously. They will want to turn up on time, bring the right equipment and get the job done as professionally as possible. That way, they know you’ll leave them a good review and they’ll get more work! To give you further peace of mind, every plumbing job done on the Handy platform is backed by the Handy Happiness Guarantee. This means that, in the unlikely event that you’re unsatisfied, Handy will work hard to make things right.
Len The Plumber is a full service plumbing and drain cleaning company serving the entire Baltimore, Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, Delaware and the Philadelphia Area as well as Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Charles, Fairfax, Alexandria, Arlington, Loudoun, Prince William, Falls Church, Manassas, Delaware, Chester, New Castle, and Stafford counties. We are continuing to grow and expand our service areas so please continue to check-in to see if we are in your area and always feel free to call if you have a question. Our service area map shows all the counties and district that we currently serve.

I had 207 Plumbing come to fix a leak in my ceiling.  It's a terrible, terrible company to do business with.  He came and fixed a broken pipe in the ceiling, and I asked him to check the rest of the pipe to make sure that nothing else was broken, he said everything was OK and charged me $219.00 for 45 minutes and left.  Never cleaned up his mess.  I went to clean up the mess after he left and found there was more damage to the pipe.  I called him to come back, which he did.  He looked at the water coming down from the ceiling, into a light fixture and said he had another job to go to and couldn't come back until next week.  He also wanted to charge me $350.00 to come back.  I told him that was too much and he said he would make an exception and only charge me $219.00.  Now I have major damage done to the ceiling, the light fixture and the floor.  All of this could have been prevented if he had stayed and fixed the problem.  I will NOT hire him again.


Alexa is an experienced lifestyle and news writer, currently working with Reader's Digest, Shape Magazine, and various other publications. She loves writing about her travels, health, wellness, home decor, food and drink, fashion, beauty, and scientific news. Follow her traveling adventures on Instagram: @living_by_lex, send her a message: [email protected], and check out her website: livingbylex.com
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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