Pro Plumbers

Accurate Leak & Line is specialized in the complete slab leak detection of sub-slab residential or commercial water and sewer piping systems. A combination of the best re-piping and Nu Flow relining repair options is offered to residential customers throughout the state. This wide variety of trenchless or traditional solutions allows our clientele to make the best decisions for their home and their pocketbook. Quality workmanship is always provided in a timely manner on all of our residential jobs, big or small.
Most states and localities require plumbers to be licensed. Although licensing requirements vary, most states and localities require workers to have 2 to 5 years of experience and to pass an exam that shows their knowledge of the trade and of local plumbing codes before they are permitted to work independently. In addition, most employers require plumbers to have a driver’s license.
Don’t try to repair, replace, or install faulty or broken plumbing equipment on your own. Hire the top plumbers in town to take care of your needs! We’re capable of detecting the source of the issues fast. Trust us to advise you on the most effective solutions custom-tailored to eliminating them. Our Cincinnati plumbing company always comes prepared with the best tools and equipment. We also provide upfront pricing and money-saving deals and specials to keep more money in your pockets.
Most typical single family home systems won't require supply piping larger than 3⁄4 inch (19 mm) due to expense as well as steel piping's tendency to become obstructed from internal rusting and mineral deposits forming on the inside of the pipe over time once the internal galvanizing zinc coating has degraded. In potable water distribution service, galvanized steel pipe has a service life of about 30 to 50 years, although it is not uncommon for it to be less in geographic areas with corrosive water contaminants.
Your plumbing service call will begin with a thorough examination of the trouble; then our technician will spend time explaining the problem and outlining your repair options. Our experts will help you evaluate your choices and make the one that’s right for you. We offer you an in-depth review of products and repair techniques so you can make informed decisions on your plumbing needs.
Hello, long story. Toilet line stopped up two years ago. A company used high pressure water to clean line. Didnt work. Came back a second time with a plummer. Spouse was told that the line had collapsed, filled with rocks or tiles. Plummer then disconnected that line put in a second line, punched a hole in my tank, fed the new line in that hole. Now two years later, each heavy rain brings a strong sewer smell into the house. Found out later that there were no rocks or tiles in original line, only a large calcium build up over 25 years that had clogged the original line. I do not know if when the new line was put in, the old line was closed properly or if either line was or should be vented? I would like the original line reconnected and the newer line just removed. I plan then to repair the hole in septic tank where the new line entered with tar or concete. I need someone to fix my smelly home.
PVC/CPVC – rigid plastic pipes similar to PVC drain pipes but with thicker walls to deal with municipal water pressure, introduced around 1970. PVC stands for polyvinyl chloride, and it has become a common replacement for metal piping. PVC should be used only for cold water, or for venting. CPVC can be used for hot and cold potable water supply. Connections are made with primers and solvent cements as required by code.[22]

Water systems of ancient times relied on gravity for the supply of water, using pipes or channels usually made of clay, lead, bamboo, wood, or stone. Hollowed wooden logs wrapped in steel banding were used for plumbing pipes, particularly water mains. Logs were used for water distribution in England close to 500 years ago. US cities began using hollowed logs in the late 1700s through the 1800s. Today, most plumbing supply pipe is made out of steel, copper, and plastic; most waste (also known as "soil")[21] out of steel, copper, plastic, and cast iron.[21]
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
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