Pro Plumbers

Even attempting to fix your plumbing problems on your own without proper knowledge can cause massive problems down the line. Book your plumber using the Handy platform and you’ll be matched with professionals who know just what they’re doing. Experienced and practiced in their craft, they’ll provide you with the best job at a price that won’t break the bank. When you use Handy to find plumbing services, you can rest assured that you’ll be connected with a capable plumbing expert who will get your job done without being a pain in the wallet.
I had 207 Plumbing come to fix a leak in my ceiling.  It's a terrible, terrible company to do business with.  He came and fixed a broken pipe in the ceiling, and I asked him to check the rest of the pipe to make sure that nothing else was broken, he said everything was OK and charged me $219.00 for 45 minutes and left.  Never cleaned up his mess.  I went to clean up the mess after he left and found there was more damage to the pipe.  I called him to come back, which he did.  He looked at the water coming down from the ceiling, into a light fixture and said he had another job to go to and couldn't come back until next week.  He also wanted to charge me $350.00 to come back.  I told him that was too much and he said he would make an exception and only charge me $219.00.  Now I have major damage done to the ceiling, the light fixture and the floor.  All of this could have been prevented if he had stayed and fixed the problem.  I will NOT hire him again.

Premier level plumbing solutions are right in your neighborhood. Bud’s Plumbing & Repair Service is your local Evansville, IN plumber specializing in full-service solutions at honest, upfront prices. In fact, we are the only plumbing company in the area offering upfront pricing. This means no surprises at the end! Want to see what your neighbors think of our services? Click here to read their reviews.
The easy to install reinforced Wax Toilet Bowl The easy to install reinforced Wax Toilet Bowl Gasket features a polyethylene flange for floor and wall bowls. Packaged in a plastic sleeve in order to maintain its shape. Accommodates 3 in. and 4 in. waste lines (sold separately). Includes a 1/4 in. x 2-1/4 in. E-Z Snap brass bolt ...  More + Product Details Close

We strive in delivering top quality service to all of our customers. We want you happy and satisfied by the time we walk out your door. We will help locate your issue with a free estimate. Explain what the problem is and offer you our service to fix the problem.  You are not obligated to use us. We treat each customer friendly, professional and courtesy.
Before you get involved with most plumbing projects, you'll need to shut off the water flowing to whatever you're working on. Most of the time, there are easy-to-access gate valves or compression valves that you can turn with your hand. Turn them clockwise all the way to turn off the water and counter-clockwise to turn it back on when you're done. For sinks, look under the sink and you'll usually see two valves—one for hot water and one for cold. On kitchen sinks, you might also see valves for the ice maker on your fridge or your dishwasher. Just turn them all off. For toilets, the valves are on the wall or right on the pipe behind the toilet.
Plumbers install and repair water, drainage, gas, and other piping systems in homes, businesses, and factories. Plumbers install plumbing fixtures such as bathtubs and toilets, and appliances, such as dishwashers and water heaters. Plumbers also maintain septic systems—the large, underground holding tanks that collect waste from houses that are not connected to a sewer system.
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
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