Pro Plumbers

JAG PLUMBING PRODUCTS is very pleased to partner JAG PLUMBING PRODUCTS is very pleased to partner with BRIGGS Plumbing Products USA to act as the direct distributor of the prestigious BRIGGS and Sayco Brand line of Repair Parts. This 2-pack of Toilet tank flappers are the exact replacement required to fix your BRIGGS Toilet. JAG PLUMBING PRODUCTS strives ...  More + Product Details Close
Drain snake. This is a simple, shorter version of the big gas-powered snake that plumbers use to clear clogs deep in your drains. But if the clog is not so deep, owning one of these can save you a good bit of money. They come in different lengths and you can buy powered versions, but a simple 25' snake with a hand-powered crank will set you back less than $25.
The easy to install reinforced Wax Toilet Bowl The easy to install reinforced Wax Toilet Bowl Gasket features a polyethylene flange for floor and wall bowls. Packaged in a plastic sleeve in order to maintain its shape. Accommodates 3 in. and 4 in. waste lines (sold separately). Includes a 1/4 in. x 2-1/4 in. E-Z Snap brass bolt ...  More + Product Details Close
We strive in delivering top quality service to all of our customers. We want you happy and satisfied by the time we walk out your door. We will help locate your issue with a free estimate. Explain what the problem is and offer you our service to fix the problem.  You are not obligated to use us. We treat each customer friendly, professional and courtesy.

Despite the Romans' common use of lead pipes, their aqueducts rarely poisoned people. Unlike other parts of the world where lead pipes cause poisoning, the Roman water had so much calcium in it that a layer of plaque prevented the water contacting the lead itself. What often causes confusion is the large amount of evidence of widespread lead poisoning, particularly amongst those who would have had easy access to piped water.[14] This was an unfortunate result of lead being used in cookware and as an additive to processed food and drink, for example as a preservative in wine.[15] Roman lead pipe inscriptions provided information on the owner to prevent water theft.
Let's start with the easiest possible project: Installing a new shower head is as simple as it gets. Typically, all you have to do is unscrew the old shower head from the shower arm (the pipe coming out of the wall), clean off the threads on the shower arm and wrap a bit of Teflon tape around it, then screw on the new shower head. It's really that simple (and if you don't believe me, check out the video above from Dummies.com). Do read the installation instructions on the shower head you buy, though. Some are designed not to require Teflon tape and can actually leak if you use it.
Drain snake. This is a simple, shorter version of the big gas-powered snake that plumbers use to clear clogs deep in your drains. But if the clog is not so deep, owning one of these can save you a good bit of money. They come in different lengths and you can buy powered versions, but a simple 25' snake with a hand-powered crank will set you back less than $25.
When a plumbing emergency happens, a plumber must be contacted immediately to help sort of the problem. A plumber who goes to a house that has a major water leak can turn off the water to help stop the home from being damaged further. This gives the homeowner a chance to begin cleaning up while the plumber gets to work handling the leak and getting the water turned back on. Any time when the home is being flooded, it is best for an emergency plumber to be called immediately.
Despite the Romans' common use of lead pipes, their aqueducts rarely poisoned people. Unlike other parts of the world where lead pipes cause poisoning, the Roman water had so much calcium in it that a layer of plaque prevented the water contacting the lead itself. What often causes confusion is the large amount of evidence of widespread lead poisoning, particularly amongst those who would have had easy access to piped water.[14] This was an unfortunate result of lead being used in cookware and as an additive to processed food and drink, for example as a preservative in wine.[15] Roman lead pipe inscriptions provided information on the owner to prevent water theft.
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