Pro Plumbers

Estimating a plumbing job is best left to the professionals. However, our guides linked to throughout this article are the best first step to understanding pricing. Understanding basic plumbing is an excellent second step. Not only does this help you diagnose potential problems before they become costly ones, but it’ll help you understand what a plumber does.
I had called Ben Franklin to fix a pin hole leak in the meter horn. Booking an appointment was very easy and the crew (Sid and Brandon) showed up on time. They quickly found out that a stop valve was not working and had to be replaced as well. Sid clearly explained my options and the charges upfront. He dealt with the city for water shut off, went about the job in a quick and efficient manner. Sid was very professional and explained clearly what he was doing. He patiently answered all my questions. Brandon was very practical and frank. As they were finishing up (I had to leave the house for an hour) they spotted a leak in another valve and fixed that also. I thought it was highly ethical of them to do so. Thank you Sid and Brandon!
B&L Plumbing Service, Inc. offers a variety of residential and commercial plumbing services in the Kansas City metro area. We are a family owned and operated business and have been satisfying our customers since 1998. At B&L Plumbing, we go above and beyond to take care of our customers and are always ready to take care of any problem that you may have with your plumbing systems. We know your time is valuable. That is why when you call, we will arrive when you need us with a skilled service technician and a well stocked truck ready to troubleshoot, and repair your plumbing problem on the spot.

Plumbing fixtures are exchangeable devices using water that can be connected to a building's plumbing system. They are considered to be "fixtures", in that they are semi-permanent parts of buildings, not usually owned or maintained separately. Plumbing fixtures are seen by and designed for the end-users. Some examples of fixtures include water closets[32] (also known as toilets), urinals, bidets, showers, bathtubs, utility and kitchen sinks, drinking fountains, ice makers, humidifiers, air washers, fountains, and eye wash stations.
I thought that my sump pump had ended its life and needed to be replaced. The contractor I found through Home Adviser came out the following day and arrived reasonably promptly.  The technician tested the pump and it wasn't responding. He then checked the  breaker panel and all seemed well. However he checked to see if power was reaching the outlet, it wasn't so he tripped some breakers and reset them and the power to my pump came on and the pump works so a replacement wasn't necessary. He charged $75.00 which I think was reasonable for a call-out fee and time spent.
The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
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