Pro Plumbers

“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.
With experience and expertise, your plumber will be able to inspect your plumbing fixtures and identify where any problems may have originated. With the right tools on hand, they’ll be able to fix the problem, right there and then. If your water heater has  triggered a full-blown flood, they’ll know exactly how and where to shut off the water supply. Should the flood be the result of a burst pipe, they’ll be able to change it before it can do any additional damage. Plumbers know a lot about their craft that we do not, and the Handy platform gives you the opportunity to book them and benefit from their knowledge and ability.
plumbers must be asked directly what they charge hourly and if that is in addition to a service charge. The two are separate and I think they have gotten away with outrageous charges because of the potential of water damaging homeowner structures.   I had a plumber (not Home advisor) come and replace a part in my kitchen sink that was under warranty---the spray nozzle had been leaking...He charged me $85.00 for 15 minutes of work and I will never use Mr King again. 
For many centuries, lead was the favoured material for water pipes, because its malleability made it practical to work into the desired shape. (Such use was so common that the word "plumbing" derives from plumbum, the Latin word for lead.) This was a source of lead-related health problems in the years before the health hazards of ingesting lead were fully understood; among these were stillbirths and high rates of infant mortality. Lead water pipes were still widely used in the early 20th century, and remain in many households. In addition, lead-tin alloy solder was commonly used to join copper pipes, but modern practice uses tin-antimony alloy solder instead, in order to eliminate lead hazards.[13]
Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.
Water systems of ancient times relied on gravity for the supply of water, using pipes or channels usually made of clay, lead, bamboo, wood, or stone. Hollowed wooden logs wrapped in steel banding were used for plumbing pipes, particularly water mains. Logs were used for water distribution in England close to 500 years ago. US cities began using hollowed logs in the late 1700s through the 1800s. Today, most plumbing supply pipe is made out of steel, copper, and plastic; most waste (also known as "soil")[21] out of steel, copper, plastic, and cast iron.[21]
I think it is rather rude and a bit dishonest for people to not divulge their total fees upfront, an of course we should know to ask. But the normal person wouldn't know the questions to ask until they are burnt once like this, and then there still could be costs for walking up stairs or charge another service call if they need to go somewhere to use the bathroom and come back. THAT ISN'T A QUESTION I WOULD THINK TO ASK.
Plumbing originated during ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Roman, Persian, Indian, and Chinese cities as they developed public baths and needed to provide potable water and wastewater removal, for larger numbers of people.[6] Standardized earthen plumbing pipes with broad flanges making use of asphalt for preventing leakages appeared in the urban settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization by 2700 BC.[7] The Romans used lead pipe inscriptions to prevent water theft. The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[8] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[9] and some were also covered with lead. Lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[10]
×